search advanced search
UNICEF Innocenti
Office of Research-Innocenti
search menu
EventEvent

Places & Spaces: Shaping policies for environments and children's well-being

A Policy Panel Discussion
(Past event)

Event type: Webinar

Related research: Children in high income countries

events24 May 2022time15:00 - 16:30
UNICEF Innocenti’s Report Card 17 – Places and Spaces: Environments and children’s well-being – will be published next week on 24 May. The report compares how 39 countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and European Union (EU) fare in providing healthy environments for children. The report looks into how rich countries are doing across three dimensions: the world of the child, the world around the child, and the world at large; and analyzes indicators such as exposure to harmful pollutants including toxic air, pesticides, damp and lead; access to light, green spaces and safe roads; and countries’ contributions to the climate crisis, consumption of resources, and e-waste. 

This panel discussion, timed with the global launch of Report Card 17, comes at a moment when policymakers are seeking to ensure child well-being during a protracted global pandemic and with mounting climate change challenges.  Join us for a rich discussion with youth activists, policymakers, researchers, and practitioners on shaping better policies for environments and children’s well-being. Panelists to be announced.

WHEN: 24 MAY 15:00 CET | 9:00 EST
WHERE: Register here.

Experts

Gunilla Olsson

UNICEF Innocenti

Dominic Richardson
Chief, Social and Economic Policy

UNICEF Innocenti

Fiona Stanley
Founding Director and Patron, Telethon Kids Institute
Abram Ilcisin
Climate Activist
Une Bastholm
Leader of the Norwegian Green Party

Related Content

World's richest countries grappling with children’s reading and math skills, mental well-being and obesity
Article

World's richest countries grappling with children’s reading and math skills, mental well-being and obesity

FLORENCE/NEW YORK, 3 September 2020 – Suicide, unhappiness, obesity and poor social and academic skills have become far-too-common features of childhood in high-income countries, according to the latest Report Card issued today by the UNICEF Office of Research – Innocenti. UNICEF’s Report Card Series – now running for 20 years – uses comparable national data to rank EU and OECD countries on childhood. Worlds of Influence: Understanding what shapes child well-being in rich countries uses pre-COVID-19 data and features a league table according to children’s mental and physical health and academic and social skill-set. Based on these indicators the Netherlands, Denmark and Norway rank as the top three places to be a child among wealthy countries.
Worlds of Influence: Understanding What Shapes Child Well-being in Rich Countries
Publication

Worlds of Influence: Understanding What Shapes Child Well-being in Rich Countries

A new look at children from the world’s richest countries offers a mixed picture of their health, skills and happiness. For far too many, issues such as poverty, exclusion and pollution threaten their mental well-being, physical health and opportunities to develop skills. Even countries with good social, economic and environmental conditions are a long way from meeting the targets set in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Focused and accelerated action is needed if these goals are to be met. The evidence from 41 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and European Union (EU) countries tells its own story: from children’s chances of survival, growth and protection, to whether they are learning and feel listened to, to whether their parents have the support and resources to give their children the best chance for a healthy, happy childhood. This report reveals children’s experiences against the backdrop of their country’s policies and social, educational, economic and environmental contexts.
Children in high income countries
Project

Children in high income countries

In-depth analysis of the latest comparable data on the well-being of children in high income countries.
Innocenti Report Card
Project

Innocenti Report Card

A look at children from the world’s richest countries offers a mixed picture of their health, skills, and happiness. For far too many, issues such as poverty, exclusion and pollution threaten their mental well-being, physical health, and opportunities to develop skills. Since 2000, the Innocenti Report Card series focuses on the well-being of children in high income countries.
Finland is the happiest country in the world – again. Or is it?
Blog Post

Finland is the happiest country in the world – again. Or is it?

Recently, news outlets across the world announced: Finland ranked happiest country in the world – again. This information is based on the World Happiness Report 2021 which uses data from the Gallup World Survey.