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Safeguarding and Ethics in Evidence Generation

(Past event)

Event type: Webinar

Related research: Ethical research and children

events27 April 2020

Safeguarding and Ethics in Evidence Generation webinar.

27th April (10am NY / Eastern Standard Time)

This webinar will connect issues relating to child safeguarding with those relating to ethics in evidence generation. It will underline key considerations in evidence generation and the planning and clearance process.   

It will then leverage the experience of experts at a partner, the US Centers for Disease Control, to describe these principles in action. Greta Massetti and Andres Villaveces will talk about how they managed ethical concerns surveying children's experience with violence.

We look forward to your active participation. You are strongly encouraged to submit your questions, comments and thoughts in advance to Gabrielle and Miles to facilitate a lively discussion.

Join via Zoom: https://unicef.zoom.us/j/223029803

One tap mobile +16699006833,,223029803# US (San Jose) +16465588656,,223029803# US (New York) Dial by your location +1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose) +1 646 558 8656 US (New York) 888 788 0099 US Toll-free 877 853 5247 US Toll-free Meeting ID: 223 029 803 Find your local number: https://unicef.zoom.us/u/aes3ok1g

Do Join by SIP 223029803@zoomcrc.com

Join by H.323 162.255.37.11 (US West) 162.255.36.11 (US East) 221.122.88.195 (China) 115.114.131.7 (India Mumbai) 115.114.115.7 (India Hyderabad) 213.19.144.110 (EMEA) 103.122.166.55 (Australia) 209.9.211.110 (Hong Kong) 64.211.144.160 (Brazil) 69.174.57.160 (Canada) 207.226.132.110 (Japan) Meeting ID: 223 029 803

For further information contact Miles Hastie (mhastie@unicef.org) or Gabrielle Berman (gberman@unicef.org)


Experts

Gabrielle Berman

UNICEF Innocenti

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