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EventEvent

Transfer Project workshop 2019

A 3-day gathering of social protection experts and stakeholders to promote cross-country learning on cash transfers
(Past event)

Event type: Workshop

Related research: Social protection and cash transfers

events02 - 04 April 2019
point map Mount Meru Hotel, Tanzania, united republic of Arusha

Resources

   

Participants at the 7th Transfer Project Workshop held April 2019 in Arusha, Tanzania. © Michelle Mills.

The Transfer Project Workshop was held in Arusha (Tanzania) from 2-4 April 2019, bringing together over 130 participants, including researchers, policy-makers, academics and development partners, from 20 different countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Over three days, participants discussed the latest evidence and shared their experiences of social protection research generation and policy-making. 

Now in its seventh iteration, the Transfer Project workshop has grown from 39 participants in 2010, to over 130 participants in 2019. It is increasingly seen as an important forum where governments exchange and learn about the use of evaluations and evidence produced by UNICEF Innocenti and partners in decision-making processes across the region. 

The Transfer Project is a collaboration between UNICEF, FAOUNC Chapel Hill, as well as national governments and local research partners. For over a decade, this multi-organisational research initiative has been producing evidence on the impacts of cash transfers in sub-Saharan Africa, going beyond measuring typical economic outcomes, to find out if and how cash impacts other aspects of people’s lives. 


Experts

Luisa Natali
Researcher

UNICEF Innocenti

Amber Peterman
Researcher

UNICEF Innocenti

Jacobus de Hoop

UNICEF Innocenti

Frank Otchere

UNICEF Innocenti

Lusajo Kajula

UNICEF Innocenti

Natalia Winder Rossi
Associate Director, Programme Division, UNICEF

Sponsors

Podcast

Tia Palermo on Evaluation of Social Cash Transfers in Sub-Saharan Africa
'Cash Plus' for adolescents in Tanzania: How it started, where it's going, and why research matters
Tia Palermo on cash transfers, gender and impact of research

Related Content

When cash alone is not enough: the transformative power of cash plus programmes
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When cash alone is not enough: the transformative power of cash plus programmes

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Researchers and Policy-Makers Discuss Evidence for Social Protection Policies in Sub-Saharan Africa
Article Article

Researchers and Policy-Makers Discuss Evidence for Social Protection Policies in Sub-Saharan Africa

(10 April 2019) Celebrating 10 years of building evidence for action on cash transfers in Africa, the Transfer Project’s latest multi-stakeholder workshop in Arusha, Tanzania recently gathered social protection experts from 20 African countries. Attended by government representatives, NGOs, academics, and donors, the workshop facilitated cross-country learning, dialogue and debate to inform the development of social protection policies.
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Social Protection, Cash Transfers and Long-Term Poverty Reduction: Transfer Project Workshop Brief 2019
Publication Publication

Social Protection, Cash Transfers and Long-Term Poverty Reduction: Transfer Project Workshop Brief 2019

Celebrating ten years of building evidence for action on cash transfers in Africa, UNICEF, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) organized the seventh regional Transfer Project workshop on “Social Protection, Cash Transfers and Long-Term Poverty Reduction” in Arusha, Tanzania from 2 to 4 April 2019. Over 130 social protection experts and stakeholders from 20 African countries attended, including government officials, UNICEF and FAO staff, academics, NGOs and other development partners.
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Social protection and cash transfers
Project Project

Social protection and cash transfers

A multi-country research and learning initiative to provide rigorous evidence on the impact of large-scale national cash transfer programmes.
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