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Worlds of Influence: Shaping policies for child well-being in rich countries

A policy panel discussion
(Past event)

Event type: Launch Event

Related research: Children in high income countries

events03 September 2020
time15:00 - 16:00 CET

UNICEF Innocenti’s Report Card 16 – Worlds of Influence: Understanding what shapes child well-being in rich countries – offers a mixed picture of children’s health, skills and happiness. For far too many children, issues such as poverty, exclusion and pollution threaten their mental well-being, physical health and opportunities to develop skills. The evidence from 41 OECD and EU countries tells a comprehensive story: from children’s chances of survival, growth and protection, to whether they are learning and feel listened to, to whether their parents have the support and resources to give their children the best chance for a healthy, happy childhood. This report reveals children’s experiences against the backdrop of their country’s policies and social, educational, economic and environmental contexts.

This panel discussion, timed with the global launch of Report Card 16, comes at a moment when policy makers are asking deep questions about how to ensure child well-being in the light of one of the worst global pandemics in many decades. In it, we delve deeply into the findings of Report Card 16 to better understand how its findings may shape the increasingly uncertain world children are living in. And we examine how the comparative data in this and previous editions of Report Card can support policies for child well-being, looking at previous outcome-based indicators as well as newer context and conditions indicators which are presented in the latest edition of Report Card.


Confirmed panelists:

Senator Rosemary Moodie, Canada

Mr. Nicolas Schmit, European Commissioner for Jobs and Social Rights

Ms. Denitsa Sacheva, Minister of Labour and Social Policy, Bulgaria

Mr. Fayaz King, Deputy Executive Director,  Field Results and Innovation, UNICEF

Mr. Dominic Richardson, Chief of Social and Economic Policy, UNICEF Office of Research – Innocenti



Experts

Dominic Richardson
Chief, Social and Economic Policy

UNICEF Innocenti

Nicolas Schmit
European Commissioner for Jobs and Social Rights
Denitsa Sacheva
Minister of Labour and Social Policy, Bulgaria
Rosemary Moodie
Senator, Canada
Fayaz King
UNICEF Deputy Executive Director of Field Results and Innovation

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