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Yekaterina Chzhen

Social Policy Specialist

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Kat joined the UNICEF Office of Research – Innocenti in 2013 after two and a half years as a Post-Doctoral Fellow in Quantitative Methods in Social and Political Sciences at the University of Oxford (Nuffield College). She has completed her PhD in Social Policy & Economics at the University of York in 2010. She has 12 years of experience in applied quantitative social science research at universities and international organisations. Her main research interests are in the areas of comparative social policy, multidimensional poverty, and child well-being. Kat is currently working on: Innocenti Report Card series, Multiple Overlapping Deprivation Analysis (MODA), and issues in children's time allocation in development settings.
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PUBLICATIONS

The 2008 financial crisis triggered the worst global recession since the Great Depression. Many OECD countries responded to the crisis by reducing social spending. Through 11 diverse country case studies (Belgium, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom, and the United States), this volume describes the evolution of child poverty and material well-being during the crisis, and links these outcomes with the responses by governments. The analysis underlines that countries with fragmented social protection systems were less able to protect the incomes of households with children at the time when unemployment soared. In contrast, countries with more comprehensive social protection cushioned the impact of the crisis on households with children, especially if they had implemented fiscal stimulus packages at the onset of the crisis. Although the macroeconomic 'shock' itself and the starting positions differed greatly across countries, while the responses by governments covered a very wide range of policy levers and varied with their circumstances, cuts in social spending and tax increases often played a major role in the impact that the crisis had on the living standards of families and children.

EDITOR(S)

Yekaterina Chzhen; Sudhanshu Handa; Brian Nolan; Bea Cantillon
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The new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development aim to build on the achievements made under the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) by broadening their scope and building upon a consultative process. The MDGs contributed to substantial social progress in eight key areas: poverty; education; gender equality; child mortality; maternal health; disease; the environment; and global partnership. The SDGs not only include a greater number of development goals than the MDGs, but are also global in focus, including advanced economies for the first time. This paper draws attention to the main challenges the 2030 Agenda presents for rich countries, by highlighting a set of critical child specific indicators, evaluating countries’ progress towards meeting the Goals, and highlighting gaps in existing data. The paper will inform UNICEFs Report Card 14, Building the Future: Children and the Sustainable Development Goals in Rich Countries.

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JOURNAL ARTICLES

BLOG POSTS

How to halve poverty in all its dimensions by 2030 (19 Oct 2017)

The way countries define poverty is going to matter for their probability of achieving Sustainable Development Goal 1, Target 1.2. It c ...

Adolescent girls in Europe and Canada at a higher risk of multidimensional poverty than boys (15 Sep 2017)

A recent paper in Child Indicators Research shows that girls aged 11, 13 and 15 are more likely to suffer from multidimensional poverty than ...

PODCASTS

Kat Chzhen on the effects of the economic crisis on children in high income countries

PROJECTS

Multidimensional child poverty

Generating quality evidence on multi-dimensional child poverty through Multiple Overlapping Deprivation Analysis (MODA).

Children in high income countries

In-depth analysis of the latest comparable data on the well-being of children in high income countries.

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