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Amber Peterman

Social Policy Specialist

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Amber Peterman, Ph.D. joined UNICEF Office of Research – Innocenti in 2015 and focuses on adolescent wellbeing and safe transitions to adulthood. Amber brings significant experience in large-scale surveys and impact evaluation in Africa, Latin America, the Middle East and Asia. With a background as a quantitative public health researcher, Amber is interested providing policy-relevant evidence related to the intersection between gender, health and human rights. Amber previously worked as an Assistant Professor at UNC Chapel Hill and as a Research Fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in Washington DC., Kampala and Dakar. Amber obtained her PhD in Public Policy with focus on international maternal and child health from UNC Chapel Hill.
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EVENTS

Social protection in contexts of fragility and forced displacement - International Conference

This conference brings together 25 priority countries, the international community and researchers to learn from existing evidence, share experience and consider new ways to utilise social protection systems in crises.
Location: Brussels
Date: 28 Sep 2017 - 29 Sep 2017

PUBLICATIONS

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is widespread globally, with an estimated one-third of women aged 15 years and over experiencing physical and/or sexual violence at the hands of an intimate partner during their lifetimes. Economic empowerment, or the financial standing of women, is often thought to protect against IPV, signalling sufficient economic autonomy to leave abusive situations or to prevent abuse. Asset ownership is one measure of economic empowerment, and can convey substantial agency as a wealth store, especially for large productive assets, such as agricultural land or home ownership. Despite the important implications of IPV reduction for policy and programming, evidence of this relationship is scarce.We hope this research will advance our global understanding of this potential.

AUTHOR(S)

Audrey Pereira; Amber Peterman; Kathryn Yount
LANGUAGES:
Six common perceptions associated with cash transfers are investigated using data from eight rigorous evaluations of government unconditional cash transfer programmes across seven countries in sub-Saharan Africa. The evidence refutes each claim. Used in policy debates, these perceptions undermine well-being improvements and poverty reduction, in Africa and globally.

AUTHOR(S)

Amber Peterman; Jennifer Yablonski; Silvio Daidone
LANGUAGES:

JOURNAL ARTICLES

BLOG POSTS

When over 500 minds converge to prevent gender-based violence (09 Oct 2017)

Late last month, over 500 researchers, policymakers, donors and activists descended on the beautiful city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil for the ...

Evidence over Ideology: Giving Unconditional Cash in Africa (02 Aug 2017)

It is hard to discuss development, poverty and foreign aid without someone mentioning the contentious topic of Universal Basic Income (UBI). ...

PROJECTS

Adolescent wellbeing

A four year programme on social and structural determinants of adolescent wellbeing in low and middle income countries.

Social protection - cash transfers

A multi-country research initiative to provide rigorous evidence on the impact of large-scale national cash transfer programmes.