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Brianna Guidorzi

Consultant (Former title)

Brianna Guidorzi is a consultant on the Time to Teach Project. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Women’s and Gender Studies from the University of Texas at Austin and a Master of Science in International Development Practice from Trinity College Dublin. She has conducted mixed methods research on gender mainstreaming and curricula in higher education in Tanzania. Her research interests widely include gender and development and social policy. Fluent in French, Brianna has previously worked with Oxfam Ireland on the topic of resilience as well as with the European Institute for Gender Equality on the topic of youth and digitalization from a gender equality perspective

Publications

Time to Teach: Assiduité des enseignants et temps d’enseignement dans les écoles primaires aux Comores
Publication Publication

Time to Teach: Assiduité des enseignants et temps d’enseignement dans les écoles primaires aux Comores

L’absentéisme des enseignants constitue un obstacle important à la réalisation d’une éducation universelle de qualité. Il est de plus en plus évident que l’absentéisme des enseignants constitue un problème particulier dans les pays à faible et moyen revenu du monde entier, les taux d’absentéisme scolaire des enseignants variant entre 15 et 45 % en Afrique subsaharienne. Aux Comores, les études existantes suggèrent que l’absentéisme des enseignants est une préoccupation latente depuis des années. Cependant, la recherchesur les facteurs, les politiques et les pratiques qui affectent la présence des enseignants restent rares. L’étude « Time to Teach » (TTT) vise à combler ce fossé de connaissance.
Time to Teach: Teacher attendance and time on task in in primary schools in Rwanda
Publication Publication

Time to Teach: Teacher attendance and time on task in in primary schools in Rwanda

Teacher absenteeism constitutes a significant barrier to achieving quality universal education. There is mounting evidence that teacher absenteeism is a challenge in low- and middle-income countries around the globe. The rates of teacher absence in these countries varies between 3 to 27 per cent. Within these average national prevalence rates, it is suspected that absenteeism may be higher in poorer, rural areas. Due to a dearth of research on teacher absenteeism, the consequences of this phenomenon are not fully evident. However, it is clear that countries are losing valuable resources they channelled into their education systems. This study moves beyond the conventional conception of teacher absenteeism—that of absence from school—to include other forms of absenteeism. The reasoning behind such a broad framing is that increasing evidence shows that school attendance does not necessarily equate to other forms of presence, including punctuality, being in the classroom, teaching for the proper duration, and teaching effectively.