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Related Innocenti Project(s):

Kaku Attah Damoah

Consultant

Kaku’s research examines poverty reduction strategies through household enterprise development, analysing how household enterprises react to various kinds of external shocks and policies. He brings that experience to UNICEF Innocenti to map out heterogeneity in household vulnerability, as well as to analyse the impact of cash transfer on vulnerable household resilience to shocks. Previously, he was a Research Fellow at the University of Florence and received his Ph.D in Economics from University of Trento.

Publications

Economic Crisis and Child Well-being in the West and Central Africa Region
Publication Publication

Economic Crisis and Child Well-being in the West and Central Africa Region

The COVID-19 pandemic that swept over the world from early 2020 has triggered both health and economic shocks of unprecedented proportions in recent memory. Some estimates suggest that the consequences of these shocks will likely erase most of the progress made in global development over the past two decades. Many countries now risk falling further behind the attainment of national and international development goals, including the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals. Children are particularly vulnerable to the effects of these shocks due to their persistent higher levels of vulnerability, and the reality that school closures and other COVID-19 containment measures can be more damaging to children. This report examines the effect of previous economic crises on children’s well-being in UNICEF’s West and Central Africa Region (WCAR) and makes projections regarding the potential impacts of COVID-19-induced economic crises on priority indicators for the region.
Supporting Families and Children Beyond COVID-19: Social protection in Southern and Eastern Europe and Central Asia
Publication Publication

Supporting Families and Children Beyond COVID-19: Social protection in Southern and Eastern Europe and Central Asia

Acknowledging that health, economic, and social crises can rapidly become a crisis for children, this paper seeks to contribute evidence to understanding what the crisis means for children and for families with children in the countries of Southern and Eastern Europe and Central Asia. In particular, what governments and stakeholders should be looking for when seeking to protect children from the worst outcomes of the crisis. In doing so, this paper asks: Through which mechanisms can COVID-19 affect children in the region? What can we learn from previous crises about the potential effects on children and those who care for children? How is vulnerability to poverty and child well-being likely to be affected? Are initial government responses to the crisis likely to worsen or mitigate risks to children’s well-being? And how might future public policies be optimized in the short and medium term to protect child outcomes?
Does COVID-19 Affect the Health of Children and Young People More Than We Thought? The case for disaggregated data to inform action
Publication Publication

Does COVID-19 Affect the Health of Children and Young People More Than We Thought? The case for disaggregated data to inform action

Blogs

COVID-19 may pose greater risk to children than originally thought
Blog Blog

COVID-19 may pose greater risk to children than originally thought

It is commonly accepted, at least for now, that children and adolescents (0-19 years) have been largely spared the direct epidemiological effects of the COVID-19 crisis on their own health and survival. This narrative is based predominantly on early data from the first affected countries of the virus, notably from China (Wuhan Province) and Italy in early 2020, and also other high-income countries including the United States and some European nations.

Podcasts

Supporting Families and Children Beyond COVID-19: Social protection in SE Europe and Central Asia
Podcast Podcast

Supporting Families and Children Beyond COVID-19: Social protection in SE Europe and Central Asia