search advanced search
UNICEF Innocenti
Office of Research-Innocenti
search menu

Profiles

email

Related Innocenti Project(s):

Gavin Wood

Disability Research Manager

Gavin joins us from UNICEF Office of Emergency Programmes (EMOPs) where he has worked over the past 6 years applying his experiences to the humanitarian emergency sector with a focus on emergency coordination, assessments and performance measurement and monitoring. Gavin has a long career in managing and developing professional technical teams, and in fostering strategic working relationships with external organizations. Gavin will be responsible for coordinating humanitarian research and evidence across the organization and providing research support and facilitating implementation of research of relevance to humanitarian action. A large part of the role will involve fostering the development of humanitarian evidence partnerships and building up collaborative networks and partnering with diverse stakeholders both within UNICEF and including with academic partners, policy actors and funders, and other UN agencies

Publications

Effectiveness of Inclusive Interventions for Children with Disabilities in Low- and Middle-income Countries: Protocol for an evidence and gap map
Publication

Effectiveness of Inclusive Interventions for Children with Disabilities in Low- and Middle-income Countries: Protocol for an evidence and gap map

Of the nearly 1 billion people with a disability, 80% live in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) and 240 million are children. Children with disabilities remain one of the most marginalized and excluded groups in society. This protocol to the Evidence and Gap Map on the Effectiveness of Inclusive Interventions for Children with Disabilities Living in LMICs aims to identify the available evidence on inclusive interventions to improve access to health, education and social services for these children, and enable them to participate fully in society by addressing discrimination, improving living conditions, incorporating mainstreaming approaches and promoting empowerment. It highlights gaps in the evidence to prioritize future research and evaluation agendas; identifies contextual factors related to various populations and settings; and provides a database of peer-reviewed and grey literature in this area.
Assistive Technology in Humanitarian Settings: Overview of Research Project
Publication

Assistive Technology in Humanitarian Settings: Overview of Research Project

There are 240 million children with disabilities in the world; half of them are out of school. Many are invisible, stigmatized, hidden by their families and abandoned by their governments. Children with disabilities, especially in humanitarian settings, are among the poorest members of the population and one of the most marginalized and excluded groups in society. With only an estimated 1 in 10 children with a need for assistive devices having access, UNICEF’s Office of Research – Innocenti undertook a study to better understand the nature and drivers of Assistive Technology (AT) access in humanitarian settings. This document provides a synthesis of the project’s various reports and papers: (1) a thematic literature review summarizes the academic evidence base regarding the provision of AT in humanitarian settings, including the nature and scale of provision and barriers and facilitators of access and provision; and (2) three case studies of countries affected by crisis to triangulate the findings of the literature review and fill identified knowledge gaps with real-world examples: Afghanistan, South Sudan, and the State of Palestine.
Barriers and Facilitators to Providing Assistive Technologies to Children with Disabilities in South Sudan
Publication

Barriers and Facilitators to Providing Assistive Technologies to Children with Disabilities in South Sudan

South Sudan is in a protracted crisis. Four million people have been displaced and many have been left living with high levels of injury, poverty and food insecurity. The impact of the crisis on children – who make up over 29% of the population – is particularly high, and a large number are at risk of being born with or acquiring a disability. Assistive technologies (AT) – the systems, services and products that enhance the functioning of people with impairments – are likely to be required by many children in South Sudan with disabilities. There is no reliable data available on disability prevalence or AT needs in South Sudan, though estimates suggest a range between 10% and 15% of the population. This work aims to understand the landscape of AT provision and the barriers and facilitators to provision and provides recommendations for priority actions.
Barriers and Facilitators to Providing Assistive Technologies to Children with Disabilities in Afghanistan
Publication

Barriers and Facilitators to Providing Assistive Technologies to Children with Disabilities in Afghanistan

Due to the impacts of the ongoing conflict, Afghanistan’s child population is at high risk of being born with or acquiring a primary or secondary disability. According to a recent estimate, up to 17% of Afghanistan’s children live with some form of disability. Assistive Technologies – the systems, services and products that enhance the functioning of people with impairments – are likely to be required by a large proportion of children with disabilities in Afghanistan. Afghanistan has signed and ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, which includes a commitment to provide assistive technologies equitably to all who need it. However, little action has been taken to meet this commitment, and there continues to be a vast gap between need and provision. This work presents the the barriers and facilitators to provision and provides recommendations to begin to close the gap.