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Profiles

Gwyther Rees

Social & Economic Policy Manager

Gwyther Rees joined UNICEF Office of Research – Innocenti in October 2017. He is working on the Report Card series on child well-being in rich countries. Prior to joining Innocenti, Gwyther worked for many years at The Children’s Society, an NGO in the UK, where he did research on children on the streets, child maltreatment, children in public care, youth justice, and children’s views of their well-being, eventually becoming Research Director there. Since 2010, Gwyther has been one of a group of researchers developing an international project called Children’s Worlds. It has become the largest and most diverse study to ask children’s views about their lives and well-being. He is Research Director of the current wave of the study that has involved over 120,000 children aged 8 to 12 years in 35 low-, middle- and high-income countries (first findings available soon). Gwyther has a BA in Economics from the University of Reading, UK an MA in Social Research from the University of Leeds, UK and a PhD that focused on longitudinal analysis of predictors of children’s subjective well-being from Cardiff University, UK.

Publications

Family-friendly policies in South Asia
Publication Publication

Family-friendly policies in South Asia

Bringing up children requires care, time and resources. Yet, too often, all over the world, parents and other primary caregivers are left to struggle with this fundamental task without enough support. The burden of responsibility tends to fall disproportionately on women. Often parents have to make impossible choices between earning enough money for their family and giving children the care that they need. The concept of ‘family-friendly policies’ has emerged as a way of thinking about and addressing these issues. There is no agreed definition of the concept, but it is generally conceived as a set of policies that help parents/caregivers to reconcile various aspects of work and family life. Such policies may differ from one region and location to another depending on, amongst other things: demographics, including the definition of what a family is, and its function; the characteristics of the labour market and the workplace; the social and cultural context, including attitudes, expectations and norms; and the economic context. This paper addresses the issue of what family-friendly policies could look like in the South Asian context, where female labor force participation is very low and more than 90 per cent of workers are in the informal sector or under informal employment. It considers how these policies can be responsive to the particular characteristics and circumstances of countries in the region – including multi-generation families, family units built around adolescent mothers (and sometimes fathers), and migration for work both within and outside countries. It also tackles the question of how family-friendly policies might need to evolve in the face of the COVID-19 crisis. By taking an equity approach to family friendly policies, we provide recommendations on how to reach families in different situations and facing different degrees of vulnerabilities, including those not working or working under very difficult circumstances.
A Lifeline at Risk: COVID-19, Remittances and Children
Publication Publication

A Lifeline at Risk: COVID-19, Remittances and Children

This briefing paper outlines the potential risks of reduction in remittances due to the pandemic for children in households receiving remittances and what can be done to minimize these risks.
Des Mondes d'Influence: Comprendre ce qui détermine le bien-être des enfants dans les pays riches
Publication Publication

Des Mondes d'Influence: Comprendre ce qui détermine le bien-être des enfants dans les pays riches

Analyser la situation des enfants dans les pays les plus riches du monde sous un nouvel angle offre une image mitigée de leur santé, de leurs compétences et de leur bonheur. Pour beaucoup trop d’entre eux, des problèmes tels que la pauvreté, l’exclusion et la pollution font peser une menace sur leur bien-être mental, leur santé physique et leurs chances d’acquérir des compétences. Même des pays qui offrent de bonnes conditions sociales, économiques et environnementales sont loin d’atteindre les objectifs fixés par le Programme de développement durable à l’horizon 2030. Pour réaliser ces objectifs, des mesures ciblées et accélérées sont nécessaires. Les données de 41 pays de l’Organisation de coopération et de développement économiques (OCDE) et de l’Union européenne (UE) parlent d’elles-mêmes, qu’il s’agisse des chances de survie, de croissance et de protection des enfants, de la question de savoir s’ils apprennent et se sentent écoutés, ou de celle de savoir si leurs parents disposent du soutien et des moyens nécessaires pour donner à leurs enfants toutes les chances de mener une enfance équilibrée et heureuse. Ce rapport révèle l’expérience des enfants face aux politiques publiques et à la conjoncture sociale, éducative, économique et environnementale de leurs pays respectifs.
Sfere di Influenza: Un'analisi dei fattori che condizionano il benessere dei bambini nei paesi ricchi
Publication Publication

Sfere di Influenza: Un'analisi dei fattori che condizionano il benessere dei bambini nei paesi ricchi

Un nuovo sguardo alla situazione dei bambini nei paesi più ricchi del mondo rivela uno scenario misto in termini di salute, competenze e felicità. Troppi problemi, come la povertà, l'esclusione e l'inquinamento, minacciano il loro benessere psicofisico e la possibilità di sviluppare le proprie abilità. Anche i paesi con condizioni sociali, economiche e ambientali favorevoli sono ben lontani dal raggiungere gli obiettivi stabiliti nell'Agenda 2030 per lo sviluppo sostenibile. Per realizzare tali obiettivi, è necessaria un'azione rapida e mirata. I dati relativi a 41 Paesi dell'Organizzazione per la cooperazione e lo sviluppo economico (OCSE) e l'Unione europea tracciano un quadro chiaro della probabilità di bambini e adolescenti di sopravvivere e crescere, di ricevere tutela, istruzione e ascolto, e della misura in cui i genitori sono in grado di fornire sostegno e risorse per garantire loro le migliori possibilità di vivere un'infanzia sana e felice. Questo studio rivela le esperienze dei bambini alla luce delle politiche e del contesto sociale, educativo, economico e ambientale dei rispettivi paesi.

Blogs

Finland is the happiest country in the world – again. Or is it?
Blog Blog

Finland is the happiest country in the world – again. Or is it?

Recently, news outlets across the world announced: Finland ranked happiest country in the world – again. This information is based on the World Happiness Report 2021 which uses data from the Gallup World Survey.

Journal articles

Contextualising the link between adolescents’ use of digital technology and their mental health: a multi‐country study of time spent online and life satisfaction
Journal Article Journal Article

Contextualising the link between adolescents’ use of digital technology and their mental health: a multi‐country study of time spent online and life satisfaction

Comparing inequality in adolescents’ reading achievement across 37 countries and over time: outcomes versus opportunities
Journal Article Journal Article

Comparing inequality in adolescents’ reading achievement across 37 countries and over time: outcomes versus opportunities

Podcasts

Uncovering An #UnfairStart: An Interview with UNICEF Report Card 15 authors on Education Inequality
Podcast Podcast

Uncovering An #UnfairStart: An Interview with UNICEF Report Card 15 authors on Education Inequality

Uncovering An #UnfairStart: An Interview with UNICEF Report Card 15 authors on Education Inequality
Podcast Podcast

Uncovering An #UnfairStart: An Interview with UNICEF Report Card 15 authors on Education Inequality

Uncovering An #UnfairStart: An Interview with UNICEF Report Card 15 authors on Education Inequality
Podcast Podcast

Uncovering An #UnfairStart: An Interview with UNICEF Report Card 15 authors on Education Inequality