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Profiles

Amber Peterman

Consultant

Amber Peterman, Ph.D. joined UNICEF Office of Research – Innocenti in 2015 as a Social Policy Specialist and now works as a consultant with joint affiliation as an Associate Adjunct Professor at UNC Chapel Hill. Amber focuses on gender, violence and adolescent wellbeing and safe transitions to adulthood with the Transfer Project evaluations of social protection and cash transfers in Africa. She has led research in over a dozen countries and brings significant experience in large-scale surveys and impact evaluation in Africa, Latin America, the Middle East and Asia. Amber previously worked as an Assistant Professor at UNC Chapel Hill and as a Research Fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in Washington DC., Kampala and Dakar. Amber obtained her PhD in Public Policy with focus on international maternal and child health from UNC Chapel Hill.

Publications

Evidence on Social Protection in Contexts of Fragility and Forced Displacement
Publication Publication

Evidence on Social Protection in Contexts of Fragility and Forced Displacement

Rigorous research in humanitarian settings is possible when researchers and programmers work together, particularly in the early stages when responses to humanitarian challenges are designed. Six new rigorous research studies from five countries: Ecuador, Mali, Niger, Lebanon and Yemen illustrate this point.
Economic Transfers and Social Cohesion in a Refugee-hosting Setting
Publication Publication

Economic Transfers and Social Cohesion in a Refugee-hosting Setting

There is increasing interest in understanding if social protection has the ability to foster social cohesion, particularly between refugees and host communities. Using an experimental evaluation of transfers, including cash, food and food vouchers to Colombian refugees and poor Ecuadorians in urban and peri-urban areas we examine if transfers resulted in changes in social cohesion measures. The evaluation was a cluster-randomized control trial examining a short-term programme implemented over six months by the World Food Programme. We examine six aggregate dimensions of social cohesion, derived from 33 individual indicators, in addition to an overall index of social cohesion. Overall results suggest that the programme contributed to integration of Colombians in the hosting community through increases in personal agency, attitudes accepting diversity, confidence in institutions, and social participation. However, while having no impact for the Ecuadorian population. There were no negative impacts of the programme on indicators or domains analysed. Although we are not able to specifically identify mechanisms, we hypothesize that these impacts are driven by joint targeting, messaging around social inclusion and through interaction between nationalities at mandated monthly nutrition trainings.
A mixed-method review of cash transfers and intimate partner violence in low and middle-income countries
Publication Publication

A mixed-method review of cash transfers and intimate partner violence in low and middle-income countries

Exploring Women's Empowerment through Asset Ownership and Experience of Intimate Partner Violence
Publication Publication

Exploring Women's Empowerment through Asset Ownership and Experience of Intimate Partner Violence

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is widespread globally, with an estimated one-third of women aged 15 years and over experiencing physical and/or sexual violence at the hands of an intimate partner during their lifetimes. Economic empowerment, or the financial standing of women, is often thought to protect against IPV, signalling sufficient economic autonomy to leave abusive situations or to prevent abuse. Asset ownership is one measure of economic empowerment, and can convey substantial agency as a wealth store, especially for large productive assets, such as agricultural land or home ownership. Despite the important implications of IPV reduction for policy and programming, evidence of this relationship is scarce.We hope this research will advance our global understanding of this potential.

Blogs

Five things we learned from research on child survivors of violence
Blog Blog

Five things we learned from research on child survivors of violence

Violence against children is a pervasive global phenomenon. Estimates indicate over 1 billion children under the age of 18 experience emotional, physical or sexual violence every year from a range of perpetrators – including parents, peers and intimate or dating partners. Despite these high figures, official figures of VAC are just the tip of the iceberg.
Five ways governments are responding to violence against women and children during COVID-19
Blog Blog

Five ways governments are responding to violence against women and children during COVID-19

While the world may have been caught off guard by the size and ramifications of the COVID-19 crisis, it should be prepared to respond to the increased risks to the wellbeing and safety of children and women. Violence against children and violence against women are widespread globally and intrinsically linked, sharing common risk factors and similar adverse and severe consequences. The literature within pandemics may be limited, but we have enough evidence to say unequivocally that related factors—such as confinement, social isolation, increased levels of financial stress, and weak institutional responses—can increase or intensify levels of violence.
The time is now! Preventing violence against women and children requires quality evidence.
Blog Blog

The time is now! Preventing violence against women and children requires quality evidence.

Reflections from the world’s premier conference on ending violence against women and violence against children from the Sexual Violence Research Initiative Forum 2019
Research on humanitarian social protection is not only possible, but desperately needed
Blog Blog

Research on humanitarian social protection is not only possible, but desperately needed

Rigorous research in humanitarian emergencies is not only feasible but also necessary to determine what constitutes effective assistance in these settings. This column introduces a Special Issue of the Journal of Development Studies which demonstrates that research establishing causal effects is vital for the design of efficient and effective social protection in settings of fragility and displacement. 

Journal articles

COVID-19 response measures and violence against children
Journal Article Journal Article

COVID-19 response measures and violence against children

COVID-19: Reducing the risk of infection might increase the risk of intimate partner violence
Journal Article Journal Article

COVID-19: Reducing the risk of infection might increase the risk of intimate partner violence

Disclosure, reporting and help seeking among child survivors of violence: a cross-country analysis
Journal Article Journal Article

Disclosure, reporting and help seeking among child survivors of violence: a cross-country analysis

Pandemics and Violence Against Women and Children
Journal Article Journal Article

Pandemics and Violence Against Women and Children

Podcasts

#HEARMETOO: UNICEF Research on Gender-Based Violence for #16Days of Activism