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Dale Rutstein

Chief, Communication

Dale leads advocacy and communication efforts for UNICEF Office of Research – Innocenti. He has served in a communication and partnership capacity with UNICEF since 1992 and has carved out a specialization in leading large scale public advocacy efforts in support of legislative and policy reform for child rights. In China he orchestrated UNICEF support for passage of the first Family Violence legislation. In the Philippines he led a lobbying coalition that secured passage of the first juvenile justice system law. He expanded UNICEF’s social media initiatives for the promotion of child rights in China reaching almost 3 million regular followers. In Albania and the Philippines Dale pioneered efforts to include the voices of disadvantaged young people on nationwide broadcast television. He holds a BA in creative writing from Hamilton College and an EdM from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Blogs

From the global epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic, insights on helping families and children cope
Blog Blog

From the global epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic, insights on helping families and children cope

Just as the coronavirus outbreak reached its peak in the Italian province of Lombardy a group of health care professionals talked to UNICEF sharing their views on helping families and children cope
Can data help end corporal punishment?
Blog Blog

Can data help end corporal punishment?

As a UNICEF communicator I’d bet that the widespread acceptance of corporal punishment – spanking, slapping, hitting, etc., a practice that seems to cross all boundaries – is one of the toughest challenges we face. Indeed, despite near universal ratification of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, only 8% of the world’s children are fully protected from being physically abused by adults.Why is corporal punishment unquestioned by so many?Answers may be in short supply, but a new discussion paper from the UNICEF Office of Research, Corporal Punishment in Schools: Longitudinal evidence from Ethiopia, India, Peru and Vietnam sheds important new light on the terrible damage this practice inflicts on children in the course of their education. Produced by the Young Lives Longitudinal Study on Child Poverty as part of the Office of Research multi-country study on violence affecting children, the paper gives a rare look at how teacher punishment in school affects children over time. The evidence is quite clear, with negative impacts observed at age 12, especially in decreased math scores, among many of the children who had experienced corporal punishment at age 8, compared with those who had not experienced it. These findings have been extensively controlled for community factors and previous school performance.The study also presents data which underlines how widespread corporal punishment can be. Among the 12,000 children studied from half to ninety percent, depending on the country, reported seeing a teacher beating a student in the last week.
Best of UNICEF Research 2015
Blog Blog

Best of UNICEF Research 2015

The Office of Research – Innocenti has just released the third edition of its annual publication Best of UNICEF Research 2015. With each edition we learn more about a key element in a global development organization’s effort to gather evidence. Over the course of its existence Best of UNICEF Research has grown in terms of the quality of research represented, the range and complexity of research questions addressed and in the programmatic and geographic scope of the submissions.Research is an essential part of UNICEF’s effort to improve the situation of the world’s children. Quality data gathering, appraisal and analysis can fuel informed decision making and planning, assess intervention impact, question practices and improve policy discourse. High quality research is carried out across the full breadth of UNICEF offices and locations. But often, especially in country offices, it is undertaken with a sharp focus on how it can support programmes for children in particular contexts. Best of UNICEF Research is now a vital tool for increasing organization-wide learning and sharing about quality research.
25 years of research on child rights at Ospedale degli Innocenti
Blog Blog

25 years of research on child rights at Ospedale degli Innocenti

UNICEF is well known for its role in responding to complex humanitarian crises affecting children around the world. The work of the UNICEF Office of Research – Innocenti, based at the 600-year-old Ospedale degli Innocenti, in Florence, Italy rarely hits world headlines. Yet over the quarter century of its existence UNICEF at Innocenti has produced ground-breaking analytical work which has informed action and shifted global development discourse on critical child rights issues.In order to mark its 25th Anniversary, the Office recently convened a special anniversary seminar to reflect on achievements and look toward future directions for research at Innocenti. In its historic Renaissance surroundings former directors and senior researchers, together with a constellation of local and national Italian partners, shared their experiences and insights. On behalf of the Italian Government, the Office’s most generous financial donor, Luca Zelioli, First Counsellor, Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, delivered opening remarks.