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Jacobus de Hoop

Humanitarian Policy Research Manager (Former title)

Jacobus (Jacob) de Hoop joined UNICEF Office of Research – Innocenti in 2015. He works as a manager of humanitarian policy research in the social and economic policy team. His research examines the role of social protection in the lives of children and adolescents in development and humanitarian contexts. Before joining UNICEF, Jacob worked as a researcher at the International Labour Organization (ILO), was affiliated with the Paris School of Economics as a Marie Curie postdoctoral fellow and worked as a consultant for the World Bank on the evaluation of a cash transfer programme in Malawi. Jacob holds a Ph.D. in Economics from the Tinbergen Institute in Amsterdam.

Publications

Impact Evaluation in Settings of Fragility and Humanitarian Emergency
Publication Publication

Impact Evaluation in Settings of Fragility and Humanitarian Emergency

Despite the challenges involved in fragile and humanitarian settings, effective interventions demand rigorous impact evaluation and research. Such work in these settings is increasing, both in quality and quantity, and being used for programme implementation and decision-making. This paper seeks to contribute to and catalyse efforts to implement rigorous impact evaluations and other rigorous empirical research in fragile and humanitarian settings. It describes what sets apart this type of research; identifies common challenges, opportunities, best practices, innovations and priorities; and shares some lessons that can improve practice, research implementation and uptake. Finally, it provides some reflections and recommendations on areas of agreement (and disagreement) between researchers and their commissioners and funding counterparts.
The Difference a Dollar a Day Can Make: Lessons from UNICEF Jordan's Hajati cash transfer programme
Publication Publication

The Difference a Dollar a Day Can Make: Lessons from UNICEF Jordan's Hajati cash transfer programme

What difference does a dollar a day make? For the poorest households in Jordan, many of whom escaped conflict in the Syrian Arab Republic, UNICEF Jordan’s Hajati humanitarian cash transfer programme helps them keep their children in school, fed and clothed – all for less than one dollar per day. In fact, cash transfers have the potential to touch on myriad of child and household well-being outcomes beyond food security and schooling.
How Do Cash Transfers Affect Child Work and Schooling? Surprising evidence from Malawi, the United Republic of Tanzania and Zambia
Publication Publication

How Do Cash Transfers Affect Child Work and Schooling? Surprising evidence from Malawi, the United Republic of Tanzania and Zambia

Impact of the United Republic of Tanzania’s Productive Social Safety Net on Child Labour and Education
Publication Publication

Impact of the United Republic of Tanzania’s Productive Social Safety Net on Child Labour and Education

Blogs

Why Child Labour Cannot be Forgotten During COVID-19
Blog Blog

Why Child Labour Cannot be Forgotten During COVID-19

In discussions of the pandemic to date, child labour (i.e. forms of work that are harmful to children) has played only a marginal role. Yet, as we describe in this blog, child labour will be an important coping mechanism for poor households experiencing COVID-related shocks.
Fast access to cash provides urgent relief to those hardest hit by COVID—19
Blog Blog

Fast access to cash provides urgent relief to those hardest hit by COVID—19

COVID—19 is wreaking health and economic turmoil worldwide. These impacts are all the more pronounced in low-income or crisis-affected countries, where the economic crisis caused by the pandemic may hit harder than the virus itself. This is the case for Jordan which, in addition to 15.7% of its population living below the poverty line, hosts 650,000 registered refugees who fled the conflict in neighbouring Syria.Since 2017, UNICEF Jordan has been supporting vulnerable households with  monthly direct cash payments (known as ‘Hajati’). This cash is ‘no strings attached’ but recipients are encouraged to use it to support children’s schooling. Forthcoming UNICEF Innocenti research reveals how Hajati positively impacts children’s lives.
Research on humanitarian social protection is not only possible, but desperately needed
Blog Blog

Research on humanitarian social protection is not only possible, but desperately needed

Rigorous research in humanitarian emergencies is not only feasible but also necessary to determine what constitutes effective assistance in these settings. This column introduces a Special Issue of the Journal of Development Studies which demonstrates that research establishing causal effects is vital for the design of efficient and effective social protection in settings of fragility and displacement. 
No Lost Generation: Cash transfers for displaced Syrian children in Lebanon
Blog Blog

No Lost Generation: Cash transfers for displaced Syrian children in Lebanon

Imagine you work for UNICEF in Lebanon. Your team has the challenging task of ensuring that half a million displaced Syrian children who fled the war in their home country attend primary school. These children live scattered throughout the country, as Lebanon has a “no-camps” policy. Many of them are traumatized and grow up in bitter poverty.

Journal articles

Cash Transfers, Early Marriage, and Fertility in Malawi and Zambia
Journal Article Journal Article

Cash Transfers, Early Marriage, and Fertility in Malawi and Zambia

Perspectives of adolescent and young adults on poverty-related stressors: a qualitative study in Ghana, Malawi and Tanzania
Journal Article Journal Article

Perspectives of adolescent and young adults on poverty-related stressors: a qualitative study in Ghana, Malawi and Tanzania

Cash Transfers, Microentrepreneurial Activity, and Child Work: Evidence from Malawi and Zambia
Journal Article Journal Article

Cash Transfers, Microentrepreneurial Activity, and Child Work: Evidence from Malawi and Zambia

No Lost Generation: Supporting the School Participation of Displaced Syrian Children in Lebanon
Journal Article Journal Article

No Lost Generation: Supporting the School Participation of Displaced Syrian Children in Lebanon