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Jacobus de Hoop

Humanitarian Policy Research Manager

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Jacobus (Jacob) de Hoop joined UNICEF Office of Research – Innocenti in 2015. He works as a manager of humanitarian policy research in the social and economic policy team. His research examines the role of social protection in the lives of children and adolescents in development and humanitarian contexts. Before joining UNICEF, Jacob worked as a researcher at the International Labour Organization (ILO), was affiliated with the Paris School of Economics as a Marie Curie postdoctoral fellow and worked as a consultant for the World Bank on the evaluation of a cash transfer programme in Malawi. Jacob holds a Ph.D. in Economics from the Tinbergen Institute in Amsterdam.
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PUBLICATIONS

What difference does a dollar a day make? For the poorest households in Jordan, many of whom escaped conflict in the Syrian Arab Republic, UNICEF Jordan’s Hajati humanitarian cash transfer programme helps them keep their children in school, fed and clothed – all for less than one dollar per day. In fact, cash transfers have the potential to touch on myriad of child and household well-being outcomes beyond food security and schooling.
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JOURNAL ARTICLES

BLOG POSTS

Why Child Labour Cannot be Forgotten During COVID-19 (18 May 2020)

In discussions of the pandemic to date, child labour (i.e. forms of work that are harmful to children) has played only a marginal role. Yet, ...

Fast access to cash provides urgent relief to those hardest hit by COVID—19 (11 Apr 2020)

COVID—19 is wreaking health and economic turmoil worldwide. These impacts are all the more pronounced in low-income or crisis-affected ...

PROJECTS

Cash Plus

Integrating cash transfers with other services, like health insurance, can generate substantial benefits for individuals as well as their households. ...

Child labour and social protection in Africa

This research project explores how national social protection programmes aimed at reducing poverty, including cash transfers, affect child labour in t ...

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