CONNECT
search advanced search
UNICEF Innocenti
Office of Research-Innocenti
search menu

Profiles

email

Priscilla Idele

Deputy Director

Priscilla Idele is Deputy Director of the UNICEF’s Office of Research-Innocenti in Florence, Italy. She is a demographer and a public health specialist with expertise in monitoring and evaluation of health, HIV/AIDS, child protection and development, and social protection programmes. Prior to the current position, she was the Chief of Data Analysis Unit at UNICEF New York, in which she led and provided oversight for global monitoring and reporting on health, HIV/AIDS and related child protection and development commitments for children and women. Prior to UNICEF, Dr Idele worked as a Strategic Information Adviser for PEPFAR in Tanzania and the USAID-funded MEASURE Evaluation Project in the USA. Dr Idele has extensive experience working in sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, East Asia, Latin America, North America and Europe. She is a recipient of the International AIDS Society (IAS) Prize for Excellence in research related to children. She holds a Ph.D in Social Statistics from the University of Southampton, United Kingdom.

Publications

Does COVID-19 Affect the Health of Children and Young People More Than We Thought? The case for disaggregated data to inform action
Publication Publication

Does COVID-19 Affect the Health of Children and Young People More Than We Thought? The case for disaggregated data to inform action

The Evolving Epidemiologic and Clinical Picture of SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 Disease in Children and Young People
Publication Publication

The Evolving Epidemiologic and Clinical Picture of SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 Disease in Children and Young People

The initial impression that paediatric SARS-CoV-2 infection is uncommon and generally mild has been replaced by a more nuanced understanding of infectious manifestations in children and adolescents across low-, middle-, and high-income countries and by demographic structure, with recognition of a widening disease spectrum. Critical knowledge gaps, especially in low- and middle-income countries remain, that have significant public policy and programme implications. Insufficient data disaggregated by age, geography and race/ethnicity are hindering efforts to fully assess prevalence of infection and disease in children and adolescents and their role in transmission. Potential biologic differences in susceptibility to infection and between children and adults need to be assessed. Determination of mother-to-child SARS-CoV-2 transmission during pregnancy or peripartum requires appropriate samples obtained with proper timing, lacking in most studies. Finally, predictors of disease progression, morbidity and mortality in children need to be determined particularly as the pandemic moves to low- and middle-income countries, where poor nutritional and health conditions and other vulnerabilities are more frequent among children than in higher-income settings. Countries, UN agencies, public health communities, donors and academia need to coordinate the efforts and work collectively to close the data and knowledge gaps in all countries (high-, middle- and low-income) for better evidence to guide policy and programme decision-making for children and COVID-19 disease.

Blogs

COVID-19 may pose greater risk to children than originally thought
Blog Blog

COVID-19 may pose greater risk to children than originally thought

It is commonly accepted, at least for now, that children and adolescents (0-19 years) have been largely spared the direct epidemiological effects of the COVID-19 crisis on their own health and survival. This narrative is based predominantly on early data from the first affected countries of the virus, notably from China (Wuhan Province) and Italy in early 2020, and also other high-income countries including the United States and some European nations.
COVID-19 may pose greater risk to children than originally thought
Blog Blog

COVID-19 may pose greater risk to children than originally thought

It is commonly accepted, at least for now, that children and adolescents (0-19 years) have been largely spared the direct epidemiological effects of the COVID-19 crisis on their own health and survival. This narrative is based predominantly on early data from the first affected countries of the virus, notably from China (Wuhan Province) and Italy in early 2020, and also other high-income countries including the United States and some European nations.
Remote Learning Amid a Global Pandemic: Insights from MICS6
Blog Blog

Remote Learning Amid a Global Pandemic: Insights from MICS6

While some countries are now moving to reopen schools, nearly 1.3 billion children are still out of school and dependent on remote learning, due to nationwide shutdowns. As national educational systems strive to meet this challenge, Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) data offer some important insights into how we can ensure every child has an equal opportunity to learn remotely.
Educating the hardest to reach: Lessons from non-formal education in Nepal
Blog Blog

Educating the hardest to reach: Lessons from non-formal education in Nepal

A total of 835,401 children and adolescents were out of school in Nepal in 2017, equivalent to 11.3 per cent of the primary and secondary school aged population (UNESCO – UIS, 2020). This rate varies across the country and population, as barriers related to poverty, social exclusion linked to caste and ethnicity, disability, social norms and gender biases, migration, child labor, mother tongue, and geographical location disproportionately keep children out of school (Nepal Ministry of Education School Sector Development Plan, 2016).

Journal articles

The evolving picture of SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 in children: critical knowledge gaps
Journal Article Journal Article

The evolving picture of SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 in children: critical knowledge gaps

Children, HIV, emergencies and Sustainable Development Goals: roadblocks ahead and possible solutions
Journal Article Journal Article

Children, HIV, emergencies and Sustainable Development Goals: roadblocks ahead and possible solutions