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Victor Cebotari

Consultant (Former title)

Victor Cebotari (PhD Social Protection, Maastricht University) joined the UNICEF Office of Research – Innocenti in 2017. His research interests span social policy, education, migration, gender, child wellbeing, and multidimensional deprivation. Before joining UNICEF, Victor worked as a researcher at Maastricht University, the Netherlands. As part of this position, he studied the effects of migration on children’s life chances in a number of countries in Sub-Saharan Africa and Eastern Europe. Prior to this, Victor was a recipient of a Marie Curie postdoctoral fellowship at Luxembourg Institute of Socio-Economic Research. During his career, Victor consulted for UNICEF, UNDP, NWO, EPRI, and several governmental agencies in Africa, Central Asia, and Eastern Europe. At UNICEF Office of Research, Victor is working on topics that bridge child education, migration, and policy development.

Publications

How relaxing develops and affects well-being throughout childhood
Publication Publication

How relaxing develops and affects well-being throughout childhood

From a developmental perspective, skills or capacities, such as ‘relaxing’, are commonly considered necessary for children to achieve optimal development and reach their full potential. From this perspective ‘relaxing’ can be considered a capacity that could help children to cope with emotional and behavioural problems and lower their levels of stress and anxiety. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to map the existing evidence of cultivating ‘relaxing’ as a key core capacity with an explicit focus on children, and understand age-related development, links to wellbeing and other core capacities, and the levels and application of ‘relaxing’ among significant adults in children’s lives. These contributions will help inform real, positive and efficient changes in general policies and practices for child development.
What Makes Me? Core capacities for living and learning
Publication Publication

What Makes Me? Core capacities for living and learning

This report explores how ‘core capacities’ – or cornerstones of more familiar concepts, such as life skills and competences – develop over the early part of the life course, and how they contribute to children’s personal well-being and development.
How enriching sensory awareness develops and affects well-being throughout childhood
Publication Publication

How enriching sensory awareness develops and affects well-being throughout childhood

‘Sensory awareness’ relates to the way humans perceive, distinguish and focus on the world through the senses. This report focuses on the enrichment of sensory processing as a core capacity. Enrichment is understood both as the child’s ability to broaden their own sensory capabilities and as the societal mechanisms to support and nurture sensory development during childhood and adolescence by various means and in various contexts, such as school and family environments. This literature review maps empirical and evidence-based theoretical knowledge of the enrichment of children’s sensory awareness and how it interacts with overall child well-being throughout childhood.
How inquiring develops and affects well-being throughout childhood
Publication Publication

How inquiring develops and affects well-being throughout childhood

There are many studies on how children ask questions and how this capacity develops over time. Drawing from a multidisciplinary evidence base, what is the empirical and theoretical knowledge of children’s inquiry, and how does it interact with overall child well-being throughout childhood? This paper maps evidence of the development of inquiry as a core capacity for children, studies the relationship between inquiring and child well-being and explores the Learning for Well-Being Foundation’s theoretical framework.