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Digital Contact Tracing and Surveillance During COVID-19

General and child-specific ethical issues
Digital Contact Tracing and Surveillance During COVID-19: General and child-specific ethical issues

Author(s)

Karen Carter; Gabrielle Berman; Manuel Garcia Herranz; Vedran Sekara

 

Publication date: 2020-11

Publication series:
Innocenti Research Briefs

No. of pages: 3

Download the report

(PDF, 0.32 MB)

Abstract

The response to COVID-19 has seen an unprecedented rapid scaling up of technologies to support digital contact tracing and surveillance. The consequent collation and use of personally identifiable data may however pose significant risks to children’s rights. This is compounded by the greater number and more varied players making decisions about how data, including children’s data, are used and how related risks are assessed and handled. This means that we need to establish clear governance processes for these tools and the data collection process and engage with a broader set of government and industry partners to ensure that children’s rights are not overlooked.
Available in:
English

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