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Resources and Child Rights

An economic perspective
Resources and Child Rights: An economic perspective

Author(s)

David Parker

 

Publication date: 6

Publication series:
Innocenti Occasional Papers, Child Rights Series

No. of pages: 32

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Abstract

This paper first examines the use of human, economic and organizational resources in producing social outputs, in terms of the two main forms that resources take: 'stocks' and 'flows'. Based on this framework, several key measures are identified for increasing the availability of resources for the implementation of child rights, including changes in technologies and processes, and the expanded use of 'non-traditional' resources for children.
Available in:
English

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