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Impact Evaluation in Settings of Fragility and Humanitarian Emergency

Impact Evaluation in Settings of Fragility and Humanitarian Emergency

Author(s)

Shivit Bakrania; Nikola Balvin; Silvio Daidone; Jacobus de Hoop

 

Publication date: 2021-02

Publication series:
Innocenti Discussion Papers

No. of pages: 39

Download the report

(PDF, 2.13 MB)

Abstract

Despite the challenges involved in fragile and humanitarian settings, effective interventions demand rigorous impact evaluation and research. Such work in these settings is increasing, both in quality and quantity, and being used for programme implementation and decision-making.

This paper seeks to contribute to and catalyse efforts to implement rigorous impact evaluations and other rigorous empirical research in fragile and humanitarian settings. It describes what sets apart this type of research; identifies common challenges, opportunities, best practices, innovations and priorities; and shares some lessons that can improve practice, research implementation and uptake. Finally, it provides some reflections and recommendations on areas of agreement (and disagreement) between researchers and their commissioners and funding counterparts.

Available in:
English

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