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Eradicating Child Malnutrition

Thailand's health, nutrition and poverty alleviation policy in the 1980s
Eradicating Child Malnutrition: Thailand's health, nutrition and poverty alleviation policy in the 1980s

Author(s)

Thienchay Kiranandana; Kraisid Tontisirin

 

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Publication date: 23

Publication series:
Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic Policy Series

No. of pages: 52

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Abstract

Available in:
English

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