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A Human Rights Conceptual Framework for UNICEF

A Human Rights Conceptual Framework for UNICEF

Author(s)

Marta Santos-Pais

 

This title is ONLY available in PDF format and can be downloaded from this page.

Publication date: 9

Publication series:
Innocenti Essay

No. of pages: 20

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Abstract

This latest 'Innocenti Essay' outlines the legal and moral stance behind UNICEF's emerging human rights ethic. It goes on to consider the implications of this thinking in terms of the organisation's perceived future role. The author attempts to end the debate between the traditional development thinkers and the rights advocates, arguing that 'development' is meaningless unless it is designed to ensure the realisation of human rights.
Available in:
English

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