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Historical Perspectives on Breastfeeding

Two essays
Historical Perspectives on Breastfeeding: Two essays

Author(s)

Sara Matthews Grieco; Carlo A. Corsini

 

Publication date: 1

Publication series:
Historical Perspectives

No. of pages: 96

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(PDF, 0.00 MB)(PDF, 0.00 MB)

Abstract

The first wave of historical studies of breastfeeding was instrumental in allowing economists, social scientists and decision-makers to guage the order of magnitude of the potantial demographic effects of changing infant feeding patterns that were apparantly underway in many third world countries. In the past 20 years much more information has become available on the effects of feeding patterns on infant mortality in developing countries, yet there are still interesting lessons to be learnt from the past. A blending of quantitative and qualitative evidence can contribute to a better understanding of behavioural dilemmas and can also help us to assess the impact of innovation and official intervention on the survival chances of infants and young children.
Available in:
English

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