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Understanding Governance of Early Childhood Development and Education Systems and Services in Low-Income Countries

Understanding Governance of Early Childhood Development and Education Systems and Services in Low-Income Countries

Pia Rebello Britto; Hirokazu Yoshikawa

Co-author(s)

Jan Van Ravens; Liliana A. Ponguta; Soojin S. Oh; Roland Dimaya; Richard C. Seder

 

Publication date: 2013-07

Publication series:
Innocenti Working Papers

No. of pages: 62

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Abstract

Over the past decade, early childhood development and education (ECDE) has received increasing attention. This has led to an influx of scientific, macroeconomic, and rights-based evidence, supporting the importance of equitably implementing quality ECDE programmes and services. Despite the increase in evidence, young children in the developing world still bear the greatest burden of poverty, disease, violence, and risk factors. Recent research suggests that equitable access to quality early childhood services (ECS) can reduce the impact of risk factors and improve outcomes.
Available in:
English

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