CONNECT
search advanced search
UNICEF Innocenti
Office of Research-Innocenti
search menu

Interviewing

Methodological Briefs - Impact Evaluation No. 12
Interviewing: Methodological Briefs - Impact Evaluation No. 12

Co-author(s)

Bronwen McDonald; Patricia Rogers

 

Publication date: 12

Publication series:
Methodological Briefs

No. of pages: 15

Download the report

(PDF, 0.00 MB)(ZIP, 0.00 MB)

Abstract

Interviews are easy to do badly and hard to do well - good planning, adequate time and appropriate skills are required. The type of interview should be carefully chosen to suit the situation rather than choosing a type of interview (such as focus groups) simply because it is commonly used. Interviews with children raise particular ethical issues that need to be carefully considered and fully addressed. This brief outlines key issues to consider in planning interviews for impact evaluation, taking into account the purpose of the evaluation, how interview data aim to complement other data for assessing impact, and the availability of resources.
Available in:
English

MORE IN THIS SERIES: Methodological Briefs

Théorie du changement
Publication Publication

Théorie du changement

Une théorie du changement explique comment les activités sont censées produire un ensemble de résultats qui contribuent à la réalisation des impacts finaux prévus. Elle peut être élaborée pour tous les niveaux d’intervention : événement, projet, programme, politique, stratégie ou organisation.
La teoría del cambio
Publication Publication

La teoría del cambio

La «teoría del cambio» explica cómo se entiende que las actividades produzcan una serie de resultados que contribuyen a lograr los impactos finales previstos. Puede elaborarse para cualquier nivel de intervención, ya se trate de un acontecimiento, un proyecto, un programa, una política, una estrategia o una organización.
Critères d’évaluation
Publication Publication

Critères d’évaluation

Les critères d’évaluation précisent les valeurs qui seront utilisées dans une évaluation. La présente note aborde spécifiquement leur utilisation dans les évaluations d’impact (études qui fournissent des informations sur les effets à long terme d’une intervention ; voir la Note n° 1, Présentation de l’évaluation d’impact), bien que ces critères puissent être utilisés dans différents types d’évaluation.
Criterios de evaluación
Publication Publication

Criterios de evaluación

La evaluación se basa en una combinación de hechos y valores (principios, atributos o cualidades que se consideran intrínsecamente buenos, deseables, importantes y de utilidad general , por ejemplo «ser justos con todos») para calibrar el mérito de una intervención (es decir, de un programa o una política). Los criterios de evaluación especifican los valores que se emplearán en esta.

MORE IN THEMATIC AREAS: Ethical research

Digital Contact Tracing and Surveillance During COVID-19. General and child-specific ethical issues
Publication Publication

Digital Contact Tracing and Surveillance During COVID-19. General and child-specific ethical issues

The response to the pandemic has seen an unprecedented rapid scaling up of technologies to support digital contact tracing and surveillance.This working paper explores the implications for privacy as the linking of datasets: increases the likelihood that children will be identifiable; increases the opportunity for (sensitive) data profiling; and frequently involves making data available to a broader set of users or data managers.
Digital Contact Tracing and Surveillance During COVID-19: General and child-specific ethical issues
Publication Publication

Digital Contact Tracing and Surveillance During COVID-19: General and child-specific ethical issues

The response to COVID-19 has seen an unprecedented rapid scaling up of technologies to support digital contact tracing and surveillance. This means that we need to establish clear governance processes for these tools and the data collection process and engage with a broader set of government and industry partners to ensure that children’s rights are not overlooked.
Ethical Considerations for Evidence Generation Involving Children on the COVID-19 Pandemic
Publication Publication

Ethical Considerations for Evidence Generation Involving Children on the COVID-19 Pandemic

This paper identifies key ethical considerations when undertaking evidence generation involving children during the mitigation stage of the pandemic (emergency phase), on subject matter relating to COVID-19 once the pandemic has been contained, and once containment policy measures, including lockdowns, have been lifted (post-emergency phase). While the COVID-19 pandemic is undoubtedly a global crisis, with evidence generation activities raising critical ethical issues that have been captured in the literature and relevant guidelines, there are specificities relating to this emergency that must be considered when unpacking potential ethical issues. Hence while ethical issues pertaining to evidence generation involving children in emergencies and humanitarian contexts are relevant and should be considered, there are factors that define this ‘special case’ that must be considered from the outset. These will inform the core ethical considerations that need to be addressed.
Ethical Considerations When Using Social Media for Evidence Generation
Publication Publication

Ethical Considerations When Using Social Media for Evidence Generation

There are significant ethical implications in the adoption of technologies and the production and use of the resulting data for evidence generation. The potential benefits and opportunities need to be understood in conjunction with the potential risks and challenges. When using social media to directly engage children and their communities, or when establishing partnerships with these organizations for data collection and analysis, adoption of these technologies and their resultant data should not be exclusively driven by short-term necessity but also by the long-term needs of our younger partners. When engaging with social media and indeed most technology, thoughtfulness, reflection and ongoing interrogation is required. This paper examines the benefits, risks and ethical considerations when undertaking evidence generation: (a) using social media platforms and (b) using third-party data collected and analysed by social media services. It is supplemented by practical tools to support reflection on the ethical use of social media platforms and social media data.