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How Inequalities Develop through Childhood

Life course evidence from the Young Lives cohort study
UNICEF OoR-Innoceniti 2015 -

Co-author(s)

Paul Dornan; Martin Woodhead

 

Publication date: 2015-01

Publication series:
Innocenti Discussion Papers

No. of pages: 60

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Abstract

This paper contributes longitudinal research evidence on these issues, notably: the impact of structural inequalities on children’s development within households and communities; the ways access to health, education and other key services may reduce or amplify inequalities; and especially evidence on the ways that children’s developmental trajectories diverge from early in life, through to early adulthood.
Available in:
English

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