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Family and Parenting Support

Policy and Provision in a Global Context
Family and Parenting Support: Policy and Provision in a Global Context

Author(s)

Mary Daly

Co-author(s)

Zlata Bruckhauf; Jasmina Byrne; Ninoslava Pecnik; Maureen Samms-Vaughan; Rachel Bray; Alice Margaria

 

Publication series:
Innocenti Insights

No. of pages: 102

Download the report

(PDF, 0.00 MB)

Abstract

Families, parents and caregivers play a central role in child well-being and development. They offer identity, love, care, provision and protection to children and adolescents as well as economic security and stability. In keeping with the spirit of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, family and parenting support is increasingly recognized as an important part of national social policies and social investment packages aimed at reducing poverty, decreasing inequality and promoting positive parental and child well-being. This publication seeks to develop a research agenda on family support and parenting support globally.
Available in:
English

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