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Children in the Bottom of Income Distribution in Europe

Risks and composition
UNICEF -

Author(s)

Emilia Toczydlowska

 

Publication date: 2016_12

Publication series:
Innocenti Working Papers

No. of pages: 28

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(PDF, 0.54 MB)

Abstract

In the context of increasing child poverty, deprivation rates and the relative child income gap, and with the most economically vulnerable children hit extensively by the crisis (Chzhen 2014), this paper sets out to understand who are the most disadvantaged children. Analysis of the composition of the children at the bottom end of the income distribution illustrates that households with a lone parent, at least one migrant member, low work intensity, low education, or in large families are overrepresented in the first decile to different degrees in European countries. The analyses also reveal immense differences in living standards for children across Europe. In European countries included in the analyses, at least 1 in 5 children in the poorest decile lives in a deprived household.  A closer look at the different dimensions of deprivation at the child-specific level, reveals what living in the poorest decile means for children’s everyday life.
Available in:
English

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