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Bottom-end Inequality

Are children with an immigrant background at a disadvantage?
UNICEF -

Author(s)

Zlata Bruckauf; Yekaterina Chzhen; Emilia Toczydlowska

 

Publication date: 2016-07

Publication series:
Innocenti Research Briefs

No. of pages: 4

Download the report

(PDF, 1.00 MB)

Abstract

The extent to which the socio-demographic composition of child populations drives inequality in child well-being depends on which children are most likely to do much worse than their peers. In this Research Brief we present evidence on the socio-economic vulnerability of immigrant children and highlight the relative contribution of immigrant background to the risks of falling behind in household income, education, health and life satisfaction.

Available in:
English

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