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Adolescents’ Mental Health

Out of the shadows. Evidence on psychological well-being of 11-15-year-olds from 31 industrialized countries
UNICEF -

Author(s)

Zlata Bruckauf

 

Publication date: 2017-12

Publication series:
Innocenti Research Briefs

No. of pages: 4

Download the report

(PDF, 0.40 MB)

Abstract

Mental health is increasingly gaining the spotlight in the media and public discourse of industrialized countries. The problem is not new, but thanks to more open discussions and fading stigma, it is emerging as one of the most critical concerns of public health today. Psychological problems among children and adolescents can be wide-ranging and may include attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), disruptive conduct, anxiety, eating and mood disorders and other mental illnesses. Consistent evidence shows the links between adolescents’ mental health and the experience of bullying. Collecting internationally comparable data to measure mental health problems among children and adolescents will provide important evidence and stimulate governments to improve psychological support and services to vulnerable children.

Available in:
English

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