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Exploring Women's Empowerment through Asset Ownership and Experience of Intimate Partner Violence

Exploring Women's Empowerment through Asset Ownership and Experience of Intimate Partner Violence

Author(s)

Audrey Pereira; Amber Peterman; Kathryn Yount

 

Publication date: 222

Publication series:
Innocenti Research Briefs

No. of pages: 3

Download the report

(PDF, 0.38 MB)

Abstract

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is widespread globally, with an estimated one-third of women aged 15 years and over experiencing physical and/or sexual violence at the hands of an intimate partner during their lifetimes. Economic empowerment, or the financial standing of women, is often thought to protect against IPV, signalling sufficient economic autonomy to leave abusive situations or to prevent abuse. Asset ownership is one measure of economic empowerment, and can convey substantial agency as a wealth store, especially for large productive assets, such as agricultural land or home ownership. Despite the important implications of IPV reduction for policy and programming, evidence of this relationship is scarce.We hope this research will advance our global understanding of this potential.

Available in:
English

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