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The Long-term Effect of Humanitarian Emergencies on Adolescents

Existing evidence, gaps and considerations for research and practitioners
The Long-term Effect of Humanitarian Emergencies on Adolescents: Existing evidence, gaps and considerations for research and practitioners

Author(s)

Jose Cuesta; Michelle Godwin; Jeremy Shusterman; Cirenia Chavez

 

Publication date: 2018-03

Publication series:
Innocenti Discussion Papers

No. of pages: 20

Download the report

(PDF, 2.09 MB)

Abstract

This short paper grew out of discussions at a two-day research workshop focused on famines and adolescents. It explores some of what we do and do not know about the impacts of humanitarian situations on adolescents’ lives. Adolescents and their specific capacities and vulnerabilities have tended to be overlooked in the design and implementation of humanitarian responses, including in social protection and further components of such  responses. This paper seeks to bring these questions to the attention of researchers, policy makers and practitioners in order to address identified priority gaps; build on existing knowledge; invest in better evidence generation; and include adolescents in research and response efforts in meaningful ways. Such improvements to humanitarian responses would assist in developing more inclusive efforts that consider all ages in the child’s life-course; aim for more sustainable well-being outcomes and help meet core commitments to children in these settings.
Available in:
English

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