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Research that Drives Change

Conceptualizing and Conducting Nationally Led Violence Prevention Research
Research that Drives Change: Conceptualizing and Conducting Nationally Led Violence Prevention Research

Author(s)

Mary Catherine Maternowska; Alina Potts; Deborah Fry; Tabitha Casey

 

Publication series:
Innocenti Research Report

No. of pages: 120

Download the report

(PDF, 3.49 MB)

Abstract

Globally, studies have demonstrated that children in every society are affected by physical, sexual and emotional violence. The drive to both quantify and qualify violence through data and research has been powerful: discourse among policy makers is shifting from “this does not happen here” to “what is driving this?” and “how can we address it?” To help answer these questions, the Multi-Country Study on the Drivers of Violence Affecting Children – conducted in Italy, Viet Nam, Peru and Zimbabwe – sought to disentangle the complex and often interrelated underlying causes of violence affecting children (VAC) in these four countries. Led by the UNICEF Office of Research – Innocenti with its academic partner, the University of Edinburgh, the Study was conducted by national research teams comprised of government, practitioners and academic researchers in each of the four countries.
Available in:
English

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