What Works to Reduce Violence against Children and Women in the Home in Low- and Middle-Income Countries?: A review of parenting programmes, informed by Social and Behaviour Change (SBC) strategies

What Works to Reduce Violence against Children and Women in the Home in Low- and Middle-Income Countries?: A review of parenting programmes, informed by Social and Behaviour Change (SBC) strategies

AUTHOR(S)
Anil Thota; Floriza Gennari; Alessandra Guedes

Published: 2023 Policy Brief

This evidence-to-policy brief is based on a rapid evidence assessment of the effectiveness of social and behaviour change (SBC)-informed interventions to reduce both violence against children and intimate partner violence in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). It is intended as a user-friendly overview for anyone with an interest in learning about the broad possibilities of addressing violence provided by SBC-informed parenting initiatives. 

The assessment aims to: 
Appraise the available evidence on the effectiveness of SBC-informed interventions that target parents and caregivers in reducing violence against children in the home
Assess the impact of parenting interventions on reducing co-occurring intimate partner violence
Identify the theories underpinning SBC-informed interventions and the settings in which SBC interventions work and for whom
Evaluate the costs and cost-effectiveness of SBC-informed parenting interventions 
Identify relevant contextual factors, including population groups, intervention characteristics and the implementation considerations required for successfully delivering SBC-informed parenting interventions.

The findings indicate that:
There is a robust evidence base demonstrating that parenting programmes informed by SBC can be effective in reducing violence perpetrated against children by parents in LMICs, provided the programmes are implemented by trained facilitators
Co-occurrence of intimate partner violence can also be reduced through SBC-informed parenting programmes
Local resources and personnel can help keep programme costs low
SBC-informed parenting programmes may be transferable to different contexts, populations and settings in LMICs. Some studies suggested programmes were successfully implemented in humanitarian settings and for parents of children of various ages. Implementation in new settings, however, should be accompanied by quality monitoring and evaluation.

Disrupting Harm in Thailand: Evidence on online child sexual exploitation and abuse

Disrupting Harm in Thailand: Evidence on online child sexual exploitation and abuse

AUTHOR(S)
UNICEF Innocenti – Global Office of Research and Foresight; ECPAT International; INTERPOL .

Published: 2022 Innocenti Research Report

Funded by the Global Partnership to End Violence against Children, through its Safe Online initiative, ECPAT, INTERPOL, and UNICEF Office of Research – Innocenti worked in partnership to design and implement Disrupting Harm – a research project on online child sexual exploitation and abuse (OCSEA). This unique partnership brings a multidisciplinary approach to a complex issue in order to see all sides of the problem. OCSEA refers to situations that involve digital or communication technologies at some point during the continuum of abuse or exploitation; it can occur fully online or through a mix of online and in-person interactions between offenders and children. The Disrupting Harm research was conducted in six Southeast Asian countries, including Thailand, and seven Eastern and Southern African countries. Data were synthesised from nine different research activities to generate each national report which tells the story of the threat, and presents clear recommendations for action.

Key findings in the Disrupting Harm in Thailand report include:

● Children and caregivers are not reporting online sexual abuse.

○ Between 10% - 31% of children (aged 12-17) who had experienced online sexual exploitation and abuse in the past year did not disclose the most recent incident to anyone.

○ Only 17% of caregivers surveyed said they would report to the police if their child experienced sexual harassment, abuse, or exploitation online.

● Children are being subjected to horrific experiences of online child sexual abuse and exploitation. Why aren’t they reporting it? The main barriers to disclosure reported by children were a lack of awareness around where to go or whom to tell.

○ 47% of children surveyed said they would not know where to get help if they or a friend were sexually assaulted or harassed.

● What are the experiences of those who are reporting? Experiences leave some children feeling ashamed, blamed, and silenced.

For more information, visit the Disrupting Harm Thailand country report page.

Download the advocacy brief.

 

Disrupting Harm in Thailand: หลัักฐานเกี่่ยวกัับแสวงหาประโยชน์์ทางเพศ และล่่วงละเมิิดทางเพศเด็็กทางออนไล

Disrupting Harm in Thailand: หลัักฐานเกี่่ยวกัับแสวงหาประโยชน์์ทางเพศ และล่่วงละเมิิดทางเพศเด็็กทางออนไล

AUTHOR(S)
UNICEF Innocenti – Global Office of Research and Foresight; ECPAT International; INTERPOL .

Published: 2022 Innocenti Research Report
AIDS, Public Policy and Child Well-being

AIDS, Public Policy and Child Well-being

AUTHOR(S)
Giovanni Andrea Cornia

Published: 2007 Innocenti Publications
This study addresses one of the greatest challenges of our time: the damage caused by HIV and AIDS to the well-being of children and families. With 38.6 million people affected by HIV in 2006, with HIV prevalence at antenatal clinics exceeding 40 per cent in areas of Botswana and KwaZulu-Natal (South Africa), with nationwide adult prevalence in excess of the critical threshold of 20 per cent in several countries, and with the prospect of a rapid spread of the disease in large swathes of India, China and the Russian Federation, the future of child well-being is seriously threatened. Certainly, in the 50 or so countries affected by the disease, the Millennium Development Goals in the field of child survival, education, poverty and basic rights will be missed, often by a large margin.
Children of International Migrants in Indonesia, Thailand, and the Philippines: A review of evidence and policies

Children of International Migrants in Indonesia, Thailand, and the Philippines: A review of evidence and policies

AUTHOR(S)
John Bryant

Published: 2005 Innocenti Working Papers
This paper considers three groups of children affected by international migration: (i) children left behind by international labour migrants from the Philippines, Indonesia, and Thailand; (ii) children of Thai nationals in Japan; and (iii) children brought along by irregular migrants in Malaysia and Thailand. Based on the limited data available from published sources, the paper constructs preliminary estimates of numbers of children involved. It then synthesizes available evidence on problems and opportunities faced by the children, and on policies towards them. There are, however, important gaps in the available evidence. The paper identifies these gaps and suggests ways in which they might be filled.
The Subterranean Child Labour Force: Subcontracted home-based manufacturing in Asia

The Subterranean Child Labour Force: Subcontracted home-based manufacturing in Asia

AUTHOR(S)
Santosh Mehrotra; Mario Biggeri

Published: 2002 Innocenti Working Papers
Child labour is widespread in home based manufacturing activities in the informal sector in most developing countries. This form of child labour will not attract the penal provisions of a country’s laws banning child labour. This paper draws on surveys carried out in five Asian countries – two low-income (India, Pakistan) and three middle-income countries (Indonesia, Philippines, Thailand) – where production of manufactured goods is subcontracted to home based workers widely. It examines the incidence of child work in such households, the child’s schooling, reasons why children are working, their work conditions, their health, and gender issues.
Social Protection in the Informal Economy: Home based women workers and outsourced manufacturing in Asia

Social Protection in the Informal Economy: Home based women workers and outsourced manufacturing in Asia

AUTHOR(S)
Santosh Mehrotra; Mario Biggeri

Published: 2002 Innocenti Working Papers
Home based work has a dual and contradictory character: on the one hand, as a source of income diversification for poor workers and the emergence of micro-enterprises, yet on the other, it is a source of exploitation of vulnerable workers as firms attempt to contain costs. This paper examines the social protection needs of women workers in this sector, and also argues for public action to promote such work as a possible new labour intensive growth strategy in these and other developing countries.
Eradicating Child Malnutrition: Thailand's health, nutrition and poverty alleviation policy in the 1980s

Eradicating Child Malnutrition: Thailand's health, nutrition and poverty alleviation policy in the 1980s

AUTHOR(S)
Thienchay Kiranandana; Kraisid Tontisirin

Cite this publication | No. of pages: 52 | Thematic area: Economic Development | Tags: child malnutrition, child poverty, health, nutrition, poverty alleviation | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
1 - 8 of 8
first previus 1 next last