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UNICEF Innocenti's complete catalogue of research and reports
Places and Spaces: Environments and children’s well-being
SPOTLIGHT

Places and Spaces: Environments and children’s well-being

Report Card 17 explores how 43 OECD/EU countries are faring in providing healthy environments for children. Do children have clean water to drink? Do they have good-quality air to breathe? Are their homes free of lead and mould? How many children live in overcrowded homes? How many have access to green play spaces, safe from road traffic? Data show that a nation’s wealth does not guarantee a healthy environment. Far too many children are deprived of a healthy home, irreversibly damaging their current and future well-being. Beyond children’s immediate environments, over-consumption in some of the world’s richest countries is destroying children’s environments globally. This threatens both children worldwide and future generations. To provide all children with safe and healthy environments, governments, policymakers, businesses and all stakeholders are called to act on a set of policy recommendations.
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A Human Rights Conceptual Framework for UNICEF
A Human Rights Conceptual Framework for UNICEF

AUTHOR(S)
Marta Santos-Pais

Published: 1999 Innocenti Essay
This latest 'Innocenti Essay' outlines the legal and moral stance behind UNICEF's emerging human rights ethic. It goes on to consider the implications of this thinking in terms of the organisation's perceived future role. The author attempts to end the debate between the traditional development thinkers and the rights advocates, arguing that 'development' is meaningless unless it is designed to ensure the realisation of human rights.
Cite this publication | No. of pages: 20 | Thematic area: Rights of the Child | Tags: children's rights, convention on the rights of the child, human rights | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
Child Rights in Latin America: From irregular situation to full protection
Child Rights in Latin America: From irregular situation to full protection

AUTHOR(S)
Emilio Garcia Mendez

Published: 1998 Innocenti Essay
The Convention on the Rights of the Child has now been ratified by 192 nations. Notwithstanding, securing the principles and necessary legal safeguards remains a difficult achievement. Laws and jurisprudence must be firmly linked to the national reality to avoid them being well-meant placebos. Are all children comprehensively protected and defended? Do the means for implementing these laws exist? Is monitoring adequate? These are on-going questions of concern for both UNICEF and the broader international children's rights community. Many of the themes raised in this essay also echo those examined in other ICDC series and studies; violence against children, juvenile offenders, street children, are all inter-related problems for which children have the right to expect effective and full legal protection.
Cite this publication | No. of pages: 32 | Thematic area: Child Protection | Tags: child protection, children's rights, children's rights violation, implementation of the crc | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
Better Schools, Less Child Work. Child Work and Education in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala and Peru
Better Schools, Less Child Work. Child Work and Education in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala and Peru

AUTHOR(S)
María Cristina Salazar; Walter Alarcón Glasinovich

Published: 1996 Innocenti Essay
On the basis of detailed statistical surveys conducted in five Latin American countries, this essay demonstrates that actual practice in the region contrasts strongly with legal norms for the minimum age at which children can be employed and the age of completion of compulsory education. As well as increasing our understanding of the complex relationships between children, work and education, the original studies also drew up measures and definitions that have subsequently been widely adopted in the region. The essay provides a review of the main findings and proposes policy guidelines on child work.
Cite this publication | No. of pages: 30 | Thematic area: Child Work and Labour, Rights of the Child | Tags: child workers, compulsory education, minimum age, right to education | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
Child Labour and Basic Education in Latin America and the Caribbean
Child Labour and Basic Education in Latin America and the Caribbean

AUTHOR(S)
James R. Himes; Vicky Colbert de Arboleda; Emilio Garcia Mendez

Published: 1994 Innocenti Essay
The high primary school enrolment rates in Latin America and the Caribbean mask poor performance in terms of the quality, relevance and cost-effectiveness of formal schooling in the region. What happens to the millions of children who repeat school years, underperform in their first years of schooling and eventually drop out? The vast majority are working children of one sort or another, but their work is likely to lead nowhere in terms of expanded opportunities or eventually to a decent standard of living for them and their future families.
Cite this publication | No. of pages: 30 | Thematic area: Child Work and Labour | Tags: basic education, child workers, minimum age, right to education | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
El Trabajo Infantile y la Educación Básica en America Latina y el Caribe
El Trabajo Infantile y la Educación Básica en America Latina y el Caribe

AUTHOR(S)
James R. Himes; Vicky Colbert de Arboleda; Emilio Garcia Mendez

Published: 1994 Innocenti Essay
The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child: Three essays on the challenge of implementation
The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child: Three essays on the challenge of implementation

AUTHOR(S)
James R. Himes

Published: 1993 Innocenti Essay
The Convention on the Rights of the Child has been variously hailed as ‘the cornerstone of a new moral ethos’ and a ‘milestone in the history of mankind’. But laws and treaties are as nothing without adequate practical follow-up. The real results will depend not upon the high-mindedness of the ideals themselves, but upon the action taken to achieve them. The ‘challenge of implementation’, is the subject of the three papers collected here. The CRC must not be dismissed as ‘another Utopia’ and it is argued that, with the right policy decisions, the convention’s initial momentum can be sustained.
Cite this publication | No. of pages: 38 | Thematic area: Convention on the Rights of the Child | Tags: convention on the rights of the child, implementation of the crc | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
La participación de los niños: de la participación simbolica a la participación autentica
La participación de los niños: de la participación simbolica a la participación autentica

AUTHOR(S)
Roger A. Hart

Published: 1993 Innocenti Essay
Una nación es democratica en la medida en que sus ciudadanos participan, especialmente a nivel comunitario. La confianza y la competencia para participare deben adquirirse gradualmente con la práctica. Por esta razón debe haber oportunidades crecientes para que los niños participen en cualquier sistema que aspire a ser democrático y particularmente en aquellas naciones que ya creen ser democraticas. Con el creciente reconocimiento de los derechos de los niños estamos comenzando a ver también un mayor reconocimiento de las habilidades de los niños.
Children's Participation: From tokenism to citizenship
Children's Participation: From tokenism to citizenship

AUTHOR(S)
Roger A. Hart

Published: 1992 Innocenti Essay
A nation is democratic to the extent that its citizens are involved, particularly at the community level. The confidence and competence to be involved must be gradually acquired through practice. It is for this reason that there should be gradually increasing opportunities for children to participate in any aspiring democracy, and particularly in those nations already convinced that they are democratic. With the growth of children’s rights we are beginning to see an increasing recognition of children’s abilities to speak for themselves. Regrettably, while children’s and youths’ participation does occur in different degrees around the world, it is often exploitative or frivolous. This Essay is written for people who know that young people have something to say but who would like to reflect further on the process. It is also written for those people who have it in their power to assist children in having a voice, but who, unwittingly or not, trivialize their involvement.
Cite this publication | No. of pages: 44 | Thematic area: Children's Participation | Tags: children's participation, children's rights, right to be heard | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
Children in Institutions in Central and Eastern Europe
Children in Institutions in Central and Eastern Europe

AUTHOR(S)
James R. Himes; Cassie Landers; Susi Kessler

Published: 1991 Innocenti Essay
To help deal with the particular needs of children at a time of rapid political and economic change in central and eastern Europe, in 1990 the UNICEF Executive Board approved a special three-year effort of "transitional support". In response to specific requests for cooperation, UNICEF was authorized "to provide technical support to rethink policies for child survival, development and protection in the context of the new situations" and to support "data collection on the situation of children and women, analytical studies, technical workshops, information materials and other related activities".
Cite this publication | No. of pages: 32 | Thematic area: Countries in Transition | Tags: economic transition, institutionalized children | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
Child Advocacy in the United States: The work of the Children's Defense Fund
Child Advocacy in the United States: The work of the Children's Defense Fund

AUTHOR(S)
James D. Weill

Published: 1990 Innocenti Essay
Cite this publication | No. of pages: 24 | Thematic area: Rights of the Child | Tags: advocacy, children's rights | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
Working for the Rights of Children
Working for the Rights of Children

AUTHOR(S)
Målfrid Grude Flekkoy

Published: 1990 Innocenti Essay
Cite this publication | No. of pages: 24 | Thematic area: Rights of the Child | Tags: children's rights, convention on the rights of the child, implementation of the crc | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
Agir pour les droits de l'enfant
Agir pour les droits de l'enfant

AUTHOR(S)
Målfrid Grude Flekkoy

Published: 1990 Innocenti Essay
Cite this publication | No. of pages: 26 | Thematic area: Rights of the Child | Tags: children's rights, implementation of the crc | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
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JOURNAL ARTICLES BLOGS
Return on Knowledge: How international development agencies are collaborating to deliver impact through knowledge, learning, research and evidence
Publication

Return on Knowledge: How international development agencies are collaborating to deliver impact through knowledge, learning, research and evidence

Effective collaboration around knowledge management and organizational learning is a key contributor to improving the impact of international development work for the world’s most vulnerable people. But how can it be proven? With only 10 years from the target date for the Sustainable Development Goals, nine of the world’s most influential agencies set out to show to the connection between the use of evidence, knowledge and learning and a better quality of human life. This book – a synthesis of stories, examples and insights that demonstrate where and how these practices have made a positive impact on development programming – is the result of the Multi-Donor Learning Partnership (MDLP), a collective effort to record the ways each of these organizations have leveraged intentional, systematic and resourced approaches to knowledge management and organizational learning in their work.
Gender Solutions: Capturing the impact of UNICEF’s gender equality evidence investments (2014–2021)
Publication

Gender Solutions: Capturing the impact of UNICEF’s gender equality evidence investments (2014–2021)

UNICEF has undertaken hundreds of gender evidence generation activities, supporting programmatic action, advocacy work and policymaking. The Gender Solutions project aims to draw together the knowledge, innovations and impacts of gender evidence work conducted by UNICEF offices since the first UNICEF Gender Action Plan was launched in 2014. A desk review identified over 700 gender-related UNICEF research, evaluation and data evidence generation activities since 2014. Twenty-five outputs were shortlisted because of their high quality and (potential for) impact and three were selected as Gender Evidence Award winners by an external review panel. By capturing the impact of this broad body of work, Gender Solutions aims to showcase UNICEF’s evidence investments, reward excellence and inform the rollout of the UNICEF Gender Policy 2021–2030 and Action Plan 2022–2025.
Annual Report 2021
Publication

Annual Report 2021

The UNICEF Innocenti Annual Report 2021 highlights the key results achieved in research and evidence to inform policymaking and programming.
Responsible Innovation in Technology for Children: Digital technology, play and child well-being
Publication

Responsible Innovation in Technology for Children: Digital technology, play and child well-being

Digital experiences can have significant negative impact on children, exposing them to risks or failing to nurture them adequately. Nevertheless, digital experiences also potentially yield enormous benefits for children, enabling them to learn, to create, to develop friendships, and to build worlds. While global efforts to deepen our understanding of the prevalence and impact of digital risks of harm are burgeoning – a development that is both welcome and necessary – less attention has been paid to understanding and optimizing the benefits that digital technology can provide in supporting children’s rights and their well-being. Benefits here refer not only to the absence of harm, but also to creating additional positive value. How should we recognize the opportunities and benefits of digital technology for children’s well-being? What is the relationship between the design of digital experiences – in particular, play-centred design – and the well-being of children? What guidance and measures can we use to strengthen the design of digital environments to promote positive outcomes for children? And how can we make sure that children’s insights and needs form the foundation of our work in this space? These questions matter for all those who design and promote digital experiences, to keep children safe and happy, and enable positive development and learning. These questions are particularly relevant as the world shifts its attention to emerging digital technologies and experiences, from artificial intelligence (AI) to the metaverse, and seeks to understand their impact on people and society. To begin to tackle these questions, UNICEF and the LEGO Group initiated the Responsible Innovation in Technology for Children (RITEC) project in partnership with the Young and Resilient Research Centre at Western Sydney University; the CREATE Lab at New York University; the Graduate Center, City University of New York; the University of Sheffield; the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the Digital Child; and the Joan Ganz Cooney Center. The research is funded by the LEGO Foundation. The partnership is an international, multi-stakeholder and cross-sectoral collaboration between organizations that believe the design and development of digital technology should support the rights and well-being of children as a primary objective – and that children should have a prominent voice in making this a reality. This project’s primary objective is to develop, with children from around the world, a framework that maps how the design of children’s digital experiences affects their well-being, and to provide guidance as to how informed design choices can promote positive well-being outcomes.

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