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UNICEF Innocenti's complete catalogue of research and reports
Places and Spaces: Environments and children’s well-being
SPOTLIGHT

Places and Spaces: Environments and children’s well-being

Report Card 17 explores how 43 OECD/EU countries are faring in providing healthy environments for children. Do children have clean water to drink? Do they have good-quality air to breathe? Are their homes free of lead and mould? How many children live in overcrowded homes? How many have access to green play spaces, safe from road traffic? Data show that a nation’s wealth does not guarantee a healthy environment. Far too many children are deprived of a healthy home, irreversibly damaging their current and future well-being. Beyond children’s immediate environments, over-consumption in some of the world’s richest countries is destroying children’s environments globally. This threatens both children worldwide and future generations. To provide all children with safe and healthy environments, governments, policymakers, businesses and all stakeholders are called to act on a set of policy recommendations.
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13 - 24 of 25
Children at Risk in Romania:  Problems old and new
Children at Risk in Romania: Problems old and new

AUTHOR(S)
Catalin Zamfir; Elena Zamfir

This paper has three parts. The first examines the problems of Romanian children at risk in their natural families; the second analyses the conditions of abandoned children, children in institutions and other children in special circumstances of risk; and the third offers a summary of the present policy environment. Since many of the features of the situation of children today and of current child-protection policies are the product of a historical process, the paper also details the evolution under the former socialist government administrations of the approach towards children and towards social protection.
Cite this publication | No. of pages: 56 | Thematic area: Countries in Transition | Tags: child care, children at risk, economic transition, institutionalized children, social policy | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
Public Policy and Social Conditions
Public Policy and Social Conditions
Published: 1993 Regional Monitoring Report
In the early 1990s considerable attention was given to the issues of stabilization, privatization, taxation and labour market adjustment in the Eastern Europe transition, but demographic and welfare issues received less attention. While the economic and social reforms undertaken were desirable they faced severe problems of implementation and involved economic, social and political costs far greater than anticipated. This first Report highlights the fact that initial hopes for rapid transformation and economic prosperity were quickly tempered by a considerable decline in output, employment and incomes, a worsening of some social indicators, and the appearance of new welfare problems. The Report warns against neglecting the social costs of transition which affect children and adults, but also threaten the entire reform process.
Public Policy and Social Conditions (Russian version)
Public Policy and Social Conditions (Russian version)
Published: 1993 Regional Monitoring Report
In the early 1990s considerable attention was given to the issues of stabilization, privatization, taxation and labour market adjustment in the Eastern Europe transition, but demographic and welfare issues received less attention. While the economic and social reforms undertaken were desirable they faced severe problems of implementation and involved economic, social and political costs far greater than anticipated. This first Report highlights the fact that initial hopes for rapid transformation and economic prosperity were quickly tempered by a considerable decline in output, employment and incomes, a worsening of some social indicators, and the appearance of new welfare problems. The Report warns against neglecting the social costs of transition which affect children and adults, but also threaten the entire reform process.
The Decline of Infant Mortality in Europe, 1800-1950: Four national case studies
The Decline of Infant Mortality in Europe, 1800-1950: Four national case studies

AUTHOR(S)
Pier Paolo Viazzo; Carlo A. Corsini

Published: 1993 Historical Perspectives
The basic facts about the secular decline of infant mortality in Europe have been known for nearly a century. Regristration series show that the levels of infant mortality in the late nineteenth century were still extremely high and could vary quite markedly from one country to another, ranging from about 100 per 1,000 live births in Norway and Sweden to 200 or even 250 per 1,000 in countries such as Germany, Austria and Russia. At the turn of the century, however, infant mortality began to fall almost right across the continent. By the 1950s, when national rates of infant mortality ranged between 20 and 50 per 1,000, the process of convergence was nearly completed. The fall in infant mortality, which was paralelled by a simultaneous and equally pronounced decline in fertility, was responsible for raising life expectancy in many European countries by more than 10 years over a remarkably short period of time. The countries reviewed in this publication are Sweden, England, France and Austria.
Cite this publication | No. of pages: 86 | Thematic area: Early Childhood | Tags: child development, health policy, historical analysis, infant mortality, social policy | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
Social Policy and Child Poverty: Hungary since 1945
Social Policy and Child Poverty: Hungary since 1945

AUTHOR(S)
Julia Szalai

Cite this publication | No. of pages: 46 | Thematic area: Countries in Transition | Tags: child poverty, social policy | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
Children and the Transition to the Market Economy: Safety Nets and Social Policies in Central and Eastern Europe

AUTHOR(S)
Giovanni Andrea Cornia; Sandor Sipos

Published: 1991 Innocenti Publications
Cite this publication | No. of pages: 252 | Thematic area: Countries in Transition | Tags: child welfare, economic and social conditions, economic transition, social policy | Publisher: Avebury, UK; UNICEF ICDC, Florence
Transition économique et coûts sociaux: la condition de l’enfance dans les pays d’Europe centrale et orientale
Transition économique et coûts sociaux: la condition de l’enfance dans les pays d’Europe centrale et orientale

AUTHOR(S)
Giovanni Andrea Cornia; Sandor Sipos

Published: 1991 Innocenti Publications
Cite this publication | No. of pages: 40 | Thematic area: Countries in Transition | Tags: child poverty, child welfare, economic and social conditions, economic transition, social policy | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
Transizione economica e costi sociali: la condizione dell'infanzia nei paesi dell'Est
Transizione economica e costi sociali: la condizione dell'infanzia nei paesi dell'Est

AUTHOR(S)
Giovanni Andrea Cornia; Sandor Sipos

Published: 1991 Innocenti Publications
Cite this publication | No. of pages: 40 | Thematic area: Countries in Transition | Tags: child poverty, child welfare, economic and social conditions, economic transition, social policy | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
Children and the Transition to the Market Economy: Safety nets and social policies in Central and Eastern Europe - Summary
Children and the Transition to the Market Economy: Safety nets and social policies in Central and Eastern Europe - Summary

AUTHOR(S)
Giovanni Andrea Cornia; Sandor Sipos

Published: 1991 Innocenti Publications
Cite this publication | No. of pages: 40 | Thematic area: Countries in Transition | Tags: child poverty, child welfare, economic and social conditions, economic transition, social policy | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
Government Expenditures for Children and their Families in Advanced Industrialized Countries, 1960-85
Government Expenditures for Children and their Families in Advanced Industrialized Countries, 1960-85

AUTHOR(S)
Sheila B. Kamerman; Alfred J. Kahn

Cite this publication | No. of pages: 64 | Thematic area: Industrialized Countries | Tags: family policy, industrialized countries, public expenditures, social policy | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
Ecuador: Crisis, adjustment and social policy in the 1980s
Ecuador: Crisis, adjustment and social policy in the 1980s
Cite this publication | No. of pages: 48 | Thematic area: Economic Development | Tags: adjustment policies, economic crisis, social policy | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
The Health Sector and Social Policy Reform in the Philippines since 1985
The Health Sector and Social Policy Reform in the Philippines since 1985

AUTHOR(S)
Wilfredo G. Nuqui

Cite this publication | No. of pages: 44 | Thematic area: National Development Programmes | Tags: health policy, national policies, social policy | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
13 - 24 of 25
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Return on Knowledge: How international development agencies are collaborating to deliver impact through knowledge, learning, research and evidence
Publication

Return on Knowledge: How international development agencies are collaborating to deliver impact through knowledge, learning, research and evidence

Effective collaboration around knowledge management and organizational learning is a key contributor to improving the impact of international development work for the world’s most vulnerable people. But how can it be proven? With only 10 years from the target date for the Sustainable Development Goals, nine of the world’s most influential agencies set out to show to the connection between the use of evidence, knowledge and learning and a better quality of human life. This book – a synthesis of stories, examples and insights that demonstrate where and how these practices have made a positive impact on development programming – is the result of the Multi-Donor Learning Partnership (MDLP), a collective effort to record the ways each of these organizations have leveraged intentional, systematic and resourced approaches to knowledge management and organizational learning in their work.
Gender Solutions: Capturing the impact of UNICEF’s gender equality evidence investments (2014–2021)
Publication

Gender Solutions: Capturing the impact of UNICEF’s gender equality evidence investments (2014–2021)

UNICEF has undertaken hundreds of gender evidence generation activities, supporting programmatic action, advocacy work and policymaking. The Gender Solutions project aims to draw together the knowledge, innovations and impacts of gender evidence work conducted by UNICEF offices since the first UNICEF Gender Action Plan was launched in 2014. A desk review identified over 700 gender-related UNICEF research, evaluation and data evidence generation activities since 2014. Twenty-five outputs were shortlisted because of their high quality and (potential for) impact and three were selected as Gender Evidence Award winners by an external review panel. By capturing the impact of this broad body of work, Gender Solutions aims to showcase UNICEF’s evidence investments, reward excellence and inform the rollout of the UNICEF Gender Policy 2021–2030 and Action Plan 2022–2025.
Annual Report 2021
Publication

Annual Report 2021

The UNICEF Innocenti Annual Report 2021 highlights the key results achieved in research and evidence to inform policymaking and programming.
Responsible Innovation in Technology for Children: Digital technology, play and child well-being
Publication

Responsible Innovation in Technology for Children: Digital technology, play and child well-being

Digital experiences can have significant negative impact on children, exposing them to risks or failing to nurture them adequately. Nevertheless, digital experiences also potentially yield enormous benefits for children, enabling them to learn, to create, to develop friendships, and to build worlds. While global efforts to deepen our understanding of the prevalence and impact of digital risks of harm are burgeoning – a development that is both welcome and necessary – less attention has been paid to understanding and optimizing the benefits that digital technology can provide in supporting children’s rights and their well-being. Benefits here refer not only to the absence of harm, but also to creating additional positive value. How should we recognize the opportunities and benefits of digital technology for children’s well-being? What is the relationship between the design of digital experiences – in particular, play-centred design – and the well-being of children? What guidance and measures can we use to strengthen the design of digital environments to promote positive outcomes for children? And how can we make sure that children’s insights and needs form the foundation of our work in this space? These questions matter for all those who design and promote digital experiences, to keep children safe and happy, and enable positive development and learning. These questions are particularly relevant as the world shifts its attention to emerging digital technologies and experiences, from artificial intelligence (AI) to the metaverse, and seeks to understand their impact on people and society. To begin to tackle these questions, UNICEF and the LEGO Group initiated the Responsible Innovation in Technology for Children (RITEC) project in partnership with the Young and Resilient Research Centre at Western Sydney University; the CREATE Lab at New York University; the Graduate Center, City University of New York; the University of Sheffield; the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the Digital Child; and the Joan Ganz Cooney Center. The research is funded by the LEGO Foundation. The partnership is an international, multi-stakeholder and cross-sectoral collaboration between organizations that believe the design and development of digital technology should support the rights and well-being of children as a primary objective – and that children should have a prominent voice in making this a reality. This project’s primary objective is to develop, with children from around the world, a framework that maps how the design of children’s digital experiences affects their well-being, and to provide guidance as to how informed design choices can promote positive well-being outcomes.

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