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UNICEF Innocenti's complete catalogue of research and reports
Places and Spaces: Environments and children’s well-being
SPOTLIGHT

Places and Spaces: Environments and children’s well-being

Report Card 17 explores how 43 OECD/EU countries are faring in providing healthy environments for children. Do children have clean water to drink? Do they have good-quality air to breathe? Are their homes free of lead and mould? How many children live in overcrowded homes? How many have access to green play spaces, safe from road traffic? Data show that a nation’s wealth does not guarantee a healthy environment. Far too many children are deprived of a healthy home, irreversibly damaging their current and future well-being. Beyond children’s immediate environments, over-consumption in some of the world’s richest countries is destroying children’s environments globally. This threatens both children worldwide and future generations. To provide all children with safe and healthy environments, governments, policymakers, businesses and all stakeholders are called to act on a set of policy recommendations.
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TransMONEE 2007 Features: Data and analysis on the lives of children in CEE/CIS and Baltic States
TransMONEE 2007 Features: Data and analysis on the lives of children in CEE/CIS and Baltic States
Published: 2007 Innocenti Publications
Despite recent economic growth, many children in the CEE/CIS Region remain vulnerable. Thousands of children continue to die before their first birthday, and increasing numbers of children are in formal care. Many young people lack employment opportunities and are at risk of marginalization. The tools to monitor these trends are often lacking, not standardized, or not routinely deployed. TRANSMONEE Features, along with the TRANSMONEE database, focuses on different aspects of children's lives, draws attention to mechanisms for monitoring trends and uses data to illuminate neglected issues. TRANSMONEE 2007 Features: Data and analysis on the lives of children in CEE/CIS and Baltic States looks closely at child survival; the forces behind the recent demographic changes occurring across the region, the challenges facing young people in their transition from school to work, and the issue of children growing up without parental care. Included with the print publication is a CD containing the MONEEInfo version of the TRANSMONEE database.
Материалы базы данных TransMONEE 2007 года: данные и анализ,касающиеся жизни детей в страна ЦВЕ/СНГ и государствах Балтии
Материалы базы данных TransMONEE 2007 года: данные и анализ,касающиеся жизни детей в страна ЦВЕ/СНГ и государствах Балтии
Published: 2007 Innocenti Publications
Несмотря на отмечаемый в последнее время экономический рост, многие дети в странах ЦВЕ/СНГ и государствах Балтии остаются уязвимыми. По-прежнему тысячи детей умирают в течение первого года жизни. Все больше детей находятся под официальной опекой. В публикации “Материалы базы данных TransMONEE 2007 года” более пристальное внимание уделяется проблеме выживаниядетей и тому, смогут ли страны ЦВЕ/СНГ достичь цели в бласти развития Декларации тысячелетия по сокращению на две трети смертности среди детей в возрасте до 5 лет; факторам, которые в последнее время привели к изменениям в уровне рождаемости, имеющим место в регионе; а также проблемам, с которыми сталкиваются молодые люди при трудоустройстве по окончании школы. Кроме того, в ней вновь ассматривается вопрос о детях, лишенных родительского попечения, в рамках проведения анализа, почему число детей, находящихся под официальной опекой, продолжает величиваться, несмотря на общее улучшение экономического положения.
The Transition Generation: Young people in school and work in Central and Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States
The Transition Generation: Young people in school and work in Central and Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States

AUTHOR(S)
Sheila Marnie; Leonardo Menchini

Published: 2007 Innocenti Discussion Papers
This paper focuses on the transition from school to labour market for the generation of young people in CEE/CIS who experienced the most turbulent years of the transition in their formative years. Using administrative data on school enrolment, as well as data from labour force surveys, the paper tracks the main trends in education enrollments in primary, lower and upper secondary, showing that the impact of the economic difficulties of the early 1990s was greater in the poorest countries of the region, and was reflected in particular in falling enrollments for the non-compulsory levels of education. The post-1998 period of economic recovery brought with it a marked divergence between upper secondary education enrollments in the Central and Eastern European countries, and the rest of the region. However, data on enrollments give only a partial picture of what happened to the school system during the transition; statistics on attendance and achievements from other data sources suggest that inequality in school access and quality increased both across the region and within countries. Education trends (using indicators measuring both quantity and quality) influence outcomes in the labour market, but can also be influenced by them: labour force surveys’ results show that young people in CEE/CIS face a high risk of unemployment or underemployment. At the same time, in particular in CEE, lack of employment opportunities encourages young people to stay longer in the education system. Mismatches between the outcomes of the education systems and labour market demand, as well as the character of recent economic growth, have resulted in significant imbalances in the labour market.
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JOURNAL ARTICLES BLOGS
Return on Knowledge: How international development agencies are collaborating to deliver impact through knowledge, learning, research and evidence
Publication

Return on Knowledge: How international development agencies are collaborating to deliver impact through knowledge, learning, research and evidence

Effective collaboration around knowledge management and organizational learning is a key contributor to improving the impact of international development work for the world’s most vulnerable people. But how can it be proven? With only 10 years from the target date for the Sustainable Development Goals, nine of the world’s most influential agencies set out to show to the connection between the use of evidence, knowledge and learning and a better quality of human life. This book – a synthesis of stories, examples and insights that demonstrate where and how these practices have made a positive impact on development programming – is the result of the Multi-Donor Learning Partnership (MDLP), a collective effort to record the ways each of these organizations have leveraged intentional, systematic and resourced approaches to knowledge management and organizational learning in their work.
Gender Solutions: Capturing the impact of UNICEF’s gender equality evidence investments (2014–2021)
Publication

Gender Solutions: Capturing the impact of UNICEF’s gender equality evidence investments (2014–2021)

UNICEF has undertaken hundreds of gender evidence generation activities, supporting programmatic action, advocacy work and policymaking. The Gender Solutions project aims to draw together the knowledge, innovations and impacts of gender evidence work conducted by UNICEF offices since the first UNICEF Gender Action Plan was launched in 2014. A desk review identified over 700 gender-related UNICEF research, evaluation and data evidence generation activities since 2014. Twenty-five outputs were shortlisted because of their high quality and (potential for) impact and three were selected as Gender Evidence Award winners by an external review panel. By capturing the impact of this broad body of work, Gender Solutions aims to showcase UNICEF’s evidence investments, reward excellence and inform the rollout of the UNICEF Gender Policy 2021–2030 and Action Plan 2022–2025.
Annual Report 2021
Publication

Annual Report 2021

The UNICEF Innocenti Annual Report 2021 highlights the key results achieved in research and evidence to inform policymaking and programming.
Responsible Innovation in Technology for Children: Digital technology, play and child well-being
Publication

Responsible Innovation in Technology for Children: Digital technology, play and child well-being

Digital experiences can have significant negative impact on children, exposing them to risks or failing to nurture them adequately. Nevertheless, digital experiences also potentially yield enormous benefits for children, enabling them to learn, to create, to develop friendships, and to build worlds. While global efforts to deepen our understanding of the prevalence and impact of digital risks of harm are burgeoning – a development that is both welcome and necessary – less attention has been paid to understanding and optimizing the benefits that digital technology can provide in supporting children’s rights and their well-being. Benefits here refer not only to the absence of harm, but also to creating additional positive value. How should we recognize the opportunities and benefits of digital technology for children’s well-being? What is the relationship between the design of digital experiences – in particular, play-centred design – and the well-being of children? What guidance and measures can we use to strengthen the design of digital environments to promote positive outcomes for children? And how can we make sure that children’s insights and needs form the foundation of our work in this space? These questions matter for all those who design and promote digital experiences, to keep children safe and happy, and enable positive development and learning. These questions are particularly relevant as the world shifts its attention to emerging digital technologies and experiences, from artificial intelligence (AI) to the metaverse, and seeks to understand their impact on people and society. To begin to tackle these questions, UNICEF and the LEGO Group initiated the Responsible Innovation in Technology for Children (RITEC) project in partnership with the Young and Resilient Research Centre at Western Sydney University; the CREATE Lab at New York University; the Graduate Center, City University of New York; the University of Sheffield; the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the Digital Child; and the Joan Ganz Cooney Center. The research is funded by the LEGO Foundation. The partnership is an international, multi-stakeholder and cross-sectoral collaboration between organizations that believe the design and development of digital technology should support the rights and well-being of children as a primary objective – and that children should have a prominent voice in making this a reality. This project’s primary objective is to develop, with children from around the world, a framework that maps how the design of children’s digital experiences affects their well-being, and to provide guidance as to how informed design choices can promote positive well-being outcomes.

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