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Places and Spaces: Environments and children’s well-being
SPOTLIGHT

Places and Spaces: Environments and children’s well-being

Report Card 17 explores how 43 OECD/EU countries are faring in providing healthy environments for children. Do children have clean water to drink? Do they have good-quality air to breathe? Are their homes free of lead and mould? How many children live in overcrowded homes? How many have access to green play spaces, safe from road traffic? Data show that a nation’s wealth does not guarantee a healthy environment. Far too many children are deprived of a healthy home, irreversibly damaging their current and future well-being. Beyond children’s immediate environments, over-consumption in some of the world’s richest countries is destroying children’s environments globally. This threatens both children worldwide and future generations. To provide all children with safe and healthy environments, governments, policymakers, businesses and all stakeholders are called to act on a set of policy recommendations.
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Child Consumption Poverty in South-Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States
Child Consumption Poverty in South-Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States

AUTHOR(S)
Leonardo Menchini; Gerry Redmond

Published: 2006 Innocenti Working Papers
This paper examines poverty in recent years among children in the countries of South Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States. The indicator used to measure poverty is found to be robust to sensitivity testing, and to correlate well with non-income indicators of well-being among children. The absolute poverty rate among children is highest where national income is lowest, and where the density of children in the population is highest. The paper analyses two dimensions of child poverty - according to household composition, and according to its urban, rural and regional dimensions. The most important findings from a policy point of view are the strong rural character of child poverty, and the relationship between child population density (at the level of the country, the sub-national region, and the household) and child poverty: where child population shares are higher, child poverty rates are also higher. This relationship, moreover, may have strengthened over time. Child population density needs to be seen more as a trigger to redistribution.
Innocenti Social Monitor 2003
Innocenti Social Monitor 2003
Published: 2003 Innocenti Social Monitor
Social Monitor 2003 reviews recent socio-economic trends in the 27 countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States. It contains six articles: Economic Growth, Poverty and Long-Term Disadvantage examines recent trends in national income, poverty and public expenditure. Debt Service: An Emerging Problem looks at the growth of external debt in the poorest countries in the region. Refugees and Displaced Persons: Still Large Numbers reviews trends in the numbers of refugees and displaced persons and their living conditions. Intercountry Adoption: Trends and Consequences analyses factors behind the increasing number of children who are internationally adopted from the region. Confronting HIV? considers recent developments in HIV/AIDS in the region and the care and treatment of people with HIV/AIDS. The special feature article, Counting Infant Mortality and Accounting for It, draws on recent survey data to question official infant mortality rates in several countries in the region. It also seeks to explain factors associated with high infant mortality rates in these countries. In addition, the Statistical Annex covers a broad range of indicators for the years 1989 to 2000-2002, including population trends, births and fertility, mortality, family formation, health, education, child protection, crime, and income, as well as comprehensive statistical profiles on each country in the region.
Innocenti  Social Monitor 2003 (Russian Version)
Innocenti Social Monitor 2003 (Russian Version)
Published: 2003 Innocenti Social Monitor
Social Monitor 2003 reviews recent socio-economic trends in the 27 countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States. It contains six articles: Economic Growth, Poverty and Long-Term Disadvantage examines recent trends in national income, poverty and public expenditure. Debt Service: An Emerging Problem looks at the growth of external debt in the poorest countries in the region. Refugees and Displaced Persons: Still Large Numbers reviews trends in the numbers of refugees and displaced persons and their living conditions. Intercountry Adoption: Trends and Consequences analyses factors behind the increasing number of children who are internationally adopted from the region. Confronting HIV? Considers recent developments in HIV/AIDS in the region and the care and treatment of people with HIV/AIDS. The special feature article, Counting Infant Mortality and Accounting for It, draws on recent survey data to question official infant mortality rates in several countries in the region. It also seeks to explain factors associated with high infant mortality rates in these countries.
Poverty in the Transition: Social expenditures and the working-age poor
Poverty in the Transition: Social expenditures and the working-age poor

AUTHOR(S)
Jeni Klugman; John Micklewright; Gerry Redmond

Published: 2002 Innocenti Working Papers
A combination of economic growth and committed revenue-raising should give most governments in Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union considerable scope to devote increased resources to tackling poverty. We review the extent and nature of poverty across the transition countries, emphasising the phenomenon of the working-age poor. We consider governments' fiscal positions and revenue raising tools, including the issue of whether some countries now have levels of external debt servicing that are so high as to hamper social sector expenditures. We analyse whether the introduction of credible unemployment benefit schemes in the CIS would aid labour market reform and hence help solve the problem there of in-work poverty (we first review experience in Central and Eastern Europe). We focus on the case of Russia, and simulate a simple scheme with 2000 household survey data. The paper concludes by considering the role of improved wages for public service workers and the targeting of categorical benefits.
Innocenti Social Monitor 2002 (Russian version)
Innocenti Social Monitor 2002 (Russian version)
Published: 2002 Innocenti Social Monitor
Социальный мониторинг, 2002 год содержит обзор социально экономических тенденций в 27 странах Центральной и Восточной Европы, а также Содружества Независимых Государств. Доклад состоит из трех статей: "Социальные тенденции в переходный период” – дается обнов ленный анализ положения в ряде областей, включая доходы и бед ность, рождаемость и смертность (в том числе младенческую), охват образованием и попечение о детях, относящихся к группе риска. “ВИЧ/СПИД и молодежь: осведомленность, поведение и поли тика” – анализируются характер распространения ВИЧ и осве домленность молодежи о предохранении от ВИЧ*инфекции. «Качество обучения – к “одностороннему разоружению в обла сти образования”?» – рассматриваются новые данные о качест ве обучения и усвоения знаний в странах переходного периода в сравнении со странами Запада.
The Impact of the Indonesian Financial Crisis on Children: An analysis using the 100 villages data
The Impact of the Indonesian Financial Crisis on Children: An analysis using the 100 villages data

AUTHOR(S)
Lisa A. Cameron

Published: 2001 Innocenti Working Papers
This paper examines the impact of the Asian crisis on children in Indonesia. School attendance dropped slightly after the onset of the crisis but has since rebounded to higher than pre-crisis levels. Fewer children are now working, although the older children who are working and are not attending school seem to be working longer hours. Several studies have examined the social impacts of the crisis. The findings can largely be summarized as showing that rather than being uniformly negative and severe, the crisis impact has been quite heterogeneous, depending on geographic location and household socio-economic status. Overwhelmingly, households have been shown to be very resilient in the face of hardship.
Cite this publication | No. of pages: 32 | Thematic area: Economic Development | Tags: child workers, economic development, economic monitoring, education, health | Publisher: IRC
An Analysis of the Role of Social Safety Net Scholarships in Reducing School Drop-Out during the Indonesian Economic Crisis
An Analysis of the Role of Social Safety Net Scholarships in Reducing School Drop-Out during the Indonesian Economic Crisis

AUTHOR(S)
Lisa A. Cameron

Published: 2001 Innocenti Working Papers
This paper uses regression and matching techniques to evaluate Indonesia’s Social Safety Net Scholarships Programme. The scholarships programme was developed to try to prevent large numbers of children from dropping out of school as a result of the Asian crisis. The expectation was that many families would find it difficult to keep their children in school and drop out rates would be high as they were during the 1980's recession. Drop-outs, however, have not increased markedly and enrolment rates have remained relatively steady. This paper examines the role played by the scholarship programme in producing this result.
A Decade of Transition
A Decade of Transition
Published: 2001 Regional Monitoring Report
The MONEE project Regional Monitoring Report of the UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre is a unique source of information on the social side of the transition taking place in the 27 countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States. Each year’s Report contains an update on the social and economic changes affecting people in the region and includes a wealth of data in a detailed Statistical Annex. The present Report provides a review of the first 10 years of transition, exploiting the fact that data are now available on many issues that cover the entire 1990s. The core chapters examine the record of the decade in four key areas affecting human welfare: income inequality and child poverty, health, education, and child protection. An introductory chapter analyses key economic and demographic trends. In each case, the Report summarizes developments to the end of the decade, discussing both the outcomes measured with statistical data and the policy options.
A Decade of Transition (Russian)
A Decade of Transition (Russian)
Published: 2001 Regional Monitoring Report
The fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 paved the way for changes in every aspect of life in this region. New opportunities and new risks emerged for all members of society. The main drive for change has been bold economic and political reform - the transition from planned systems to market economies and from authoritarian regimes to more participatory societies. But the 1990s also saw a broader, worldwide transition: a change in thinking about what constitutes social progress. The 1990s represent only the first period in a continuing process of economic and social change. Nevertheless, a decade is sufficient time to see the main trends clearly and to identify both the advances and the setbacks that the transition has entailed for different aspects of human welfare, together with the possibilities for progress in the future.
The Impact of Economic Crisis and Adjustment on Health Care in Mexico
The Impact of Economic Crisis and Adjustment on Health Care in Mexico

AUTHOR(S)
Carlos Cruz Rivero; Rafael Lozano Ascencio; Julio Querol Vinagre

Cite this publication | No. of pages: 40 | Thematic area: Economic Development | Tags: adjustment policies, economic monitoring, health care facilities | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
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JOURNAL ARTICLES BLOGS
Return on Knowledge: How international development agencies are collaborating to deliver impact through knowledge, learning, research and evidence
Publication

Return on Knowledge: How international development agencies are collaborating to deliver impact through knowledge, learning, research and evidence

Effective collaboration around knowledge management and organizational learning is a key contributor to improving the impact of international development work for the world’s most vulnerable people. But how can it be proven? With only 10 years from the target date for the Sustainable Development Goals, nine of the world’s most influential agencies set out to show to the connection between the use of evidence, knowledge and learning and a better quality of human life. This book – a synthesis of stories, examples and insights that demonstrate where and how these practices have made a positive impact on development programming – is the result of the Multi-Donor Learning Partnership (MDLP), a collective effort to record the ways each of these organizations have leveraged intentional, systematic and resourced approaches to knowledge management and organizational learning in their work.
Gender Solutions: Capturing the impact of UNICEF’s gender equality evidence investments (2014–2021)
Publication

Gender Solutions: Capturing the impact of UNICEF’s gender equality evidence investments (2014–2021)

UNICEF has undertaken hundreds of gender evidence generation activities, supporting programmatic action, advocacy work and policymaking. The Gender Solutions project aims to draw together the knowledge, innovations and impacts of gender evidence work conducted by UNICEF offices since the first UNICEF Gender Action Plan was launched in 2014. A desk review identified over 700 gender-related UNICEF research, evaluation and data evidence generation activities since 2014. Twenty-five outputs were shortlisted because of their high quality and (potential for) impact and three were selected as Gender Evidence Award winners by an external review panel. By capturing the impact of this broad body of work, Gender Solutions aims to showcase UNICEF’s evidence investments, reward excellence and inform the rollout of the UNICEF Gender Policy 2021–2030 and Action Plan 2022–2025.
Annual Report 2021
Publication

Annual Report 2021

The UNICEF Innocenti Annual Report 2021 highlights the key results achieved in research and evidence to inform policymaking and programming.
Responsible Innovation in Technology for Children: Digital technology, play and child well-being
Publication

Responsible Innovation in Technology for Children: Digital technology, play and child well-being

Digital experiences can have significant negative impact on children, exposing them to risks or failing to nurture them adequately. Nevertheless, digital experiences also potentially yield enormous benefits for children, enabling them to learn, to create, to develop friendships, and to build worlds. While global efforts to deepen our understanding of the prevalence and impact of digital risks of harm are burgeoning – a development that is both welcome and necessary – less attention has been paid to understanding and optimizing the benefits that digital technology can provide in supporting children’s rights and their well-being. Benefits here refer not only to the absence of harm, but also to creating additional positive value. How should we recognize the opportunities and benefits of digital technology for children’s well-being? What is the relationship between the design of digital experiences – in particular, play-centred design – and the well-being of children? What guidance and measures can we use to strengthen the design of digital environments to promote positive outcomes for children? And how can we make sure that children’s insights and needs form the foundation of our work in this space? These questions matter for all those who design and promote digital experiences, to keep children safe and happy, and enable positive development and learning. These questions are particularly relevant as the world shifts its attention to emerging digital technologies and experiences, from artificial intelligence (AI) to the metaverse, and seeks to understand their impact on people and society. To begin to tackle these questions, UNICEF and the LEGO Group initiated the Responsible Innovation in Technology for Children (RITEC) project in partnership with the Young and Resilient Research Centre at Western Sydney University; the CREATE Lab at New York University; the Graduate Center, City University of New York; the University of Sheffield; the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the Digital Child; and the Joan Ganz Cooney Center. The research is funded by the LEGO Foundation. The partnership is an international, multi-stakeholder and cross-sectoral collaboration between organizations that believe the design and development of digital technology should support the rights and well-being of children as a primary objective – and that children should have a prominent voice in making this a reality. This project’s primary objective is to develop, with children from around the world, a framework that maps how the design of children’s digital experiences affects their well-being, and to provide guidance as to how informed design choices can promote positive well-being outcomes.

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