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UNICEF Innocenti's complete catalogue of research and reports
Places and Spaces: Environments and children’s well-being
SPOTLIGHT

Places and Spaces: Environments and children’s well-being

Report Card 17 explores how 43 OECD/EU countries are faring in providing healthy environments for children. Do children have clean water to drink? Do they have good-quality air to breathe? Are their homes free of lead and mould? How many children live in overcrowded homes? How many have access to green play spaces, safe from road traffic? Data show that a nation’s wealth does not guarantee a healthy environment. Far too many children are deprived of a healthy home, irreversibly damaging their current and future well-being. Beyond children’s immediate environments, over-consumption in some of the world’s richest countries is destroying children’s environments globally. This threatens both children worldwide and future generations. To provide all children with safe and healthy environments, governments, policymakers, businesses and all stakeholders are called to act on a set of policy recommendations.
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Bambini a rischio in Europa centrale ed orientale: pericoli e prospettive - sintesi
Bambini a rischio in Europa centrale ed orientale: pericoli e prospettive - sintesi
Published: 1997 Regional Monitoring Report
Questa pubblicazione è una sintesi del quarto Regional Monitoring Report che copre 18 paesi dell'Europa Centrale ed Orientale e dell'ex Unione Sovietica. Il quarto rapporto contiene: un aggiornamento sui cambiamenti nelle condizioni di vita delle famiglie e dell'infanzia; un indagine sui fattori di rischio per l'infanzia durante la transizione; un'analisi speciale sui bambini affidati alle cure pubbliche.
Children in Difficult Circumstances in Poland
Children in Difficult Circumstances in Poland

AUTHOR(S)
Stanislawa Golinowska; Bozena Balcerzak-Paradowska; Bozena Kolaczek; Dorata Glogosz

This paper offers an analysis of the hardships and the threats to children during the transition in Poland. Because all the various poverty lines used to distinguish the poor from the non-poor point to the same conclusion that under-15-year-olds represent the population group most at risk of poverty. The paper also presents a picture of the most significant negative social effects of the transition process, particularly as they apply to households with children.
Cite this publication | No. of pages: 66 | Thematic area: Countries in Transition | Tags: child poverty, economic and social conditions, economic transition | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
Children at Risk in Romania:  Problems old and new
Children at Risk in Romania: Problems old and new

AUTHOR(S)
Catalin Zamfir; Elena Zamfir

This paper has three parts. The first examines the problems of Romanian children at risk in their natural families; the second analyses the conditions of abandoned children, children in institutions and other children in special circumstances of risk; and the third offers a summary of the present policy environment. Since many of the features of the situation of children today and of current child-protection policies are the product of a historical process, the paper also details the evolution under the former socialist government administrations of the approach towards children and towards social protection.
Cite this publication | No. of pages: 56 | Thematic area: Countries in Transition | Tags: child care, children at risk, economic transition, institutionalized children, social policy | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
The Transition in Georgia:  From collapse to optimism
The Transition in Georgia: From collapse to optimism

AUTHOR(S)
Teimuraz Gogishvili; Joseph Gogodze; Amiran Tsakadze

This working paper documents the economic and social crises in Georgia during the 1990s, their structural causes and the survival strategies adopted by the Georgian population, the vast majority of whom became impoverished, with large families particularly vulnerable. It also examines the hopes for improvement that began to appear in 1995 with the stabilization of the political and criminal situation, the adoption of a new currency and constitution, and real rises in GDP, production and the value of wages across the economy.
Cite this publication | No. of pages: 54 | Thematic area: Countries in Transition | Tags: economic transition, poverty, social development | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
Poverty, Children and Policy: Responses for a brighter future
Poverty, Children and Policy: Responses for a brighter future
Published: 1995 Regional Monitoring Report
Despite improved economic performance in Central and Eastern Europe in 1994 and 1995, there was still no clear and comprehensive evidence that the welfare crisis was ending. This third Regional Monitoring Report confirms the social trends observed since 1989, showing in particular that children have suffered disproportionately in the fields of child care, education, adolescent protection and poverty. The Report maintains that untimely, partial, or clearly erroneous policies have contributed to this deterioration in child welfare and proposes a series of policy guidelines for a "transition with a human face". These include the promotion of an employment and self-employment based anti-poverty strategy and some important measures in the fields of health, education and child care.
Cite this publication | No. of pages: 156 | Thematic area: Countries in Transition | Tags: economic development, economic transition, poverty | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
Economic Reforms and Family Well-being in Belarus: Caught between legacies and prospects
Economic Reforms and Family Well-being in Belarus: Caught between legacies and prospects

AUTHOR(S)
Galina I. Gasyuk; Antonina P. Morova

Cite this publication | No. of pages: 50 | Thematic area: Countries in Transition | Tags: economic reform, economic transition, family policy, family welfare | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
Economic Transition in the Baltics: Independence, market reforms and child well-being in Lithuania
Economic Transition in the Baltics: Independence, market reforms and child well-being in Lithuania

AUTHOR(S)
Romas Lazutka; Zita Sniukstiene

Cite this publication | No. of pages: 50 | Thematic area: Countries in Transition | Tags: child welfare, economic reform, economic transition, market economy | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
Child Institutionalization and Child Protection in Central and Eastern Europe
Child Institutionalization and Child Protection in Central and Eastern Europe

AUTHOR(S)
Mary Anne Burke

This paper looks at how the transition from the planned to the free market economy has altered the nature of state protective child care provision in Central and Eastern Europe. The old systems were run according to an underlying state ideology that stressed an insensitive ‘medical model’ of care. This ‘treatment’ was often a worse fate than the deprived contexts from which the children had been removed. But matters have little improved since the collapse of the old regimes. The economic, political, moral and spiritual ramifications of the rapid transition have led to further social unravelling. And children have borne the brunt of its effects.
Cite this publication | No. of pages: 58 | Thematic area: Countries in Transition | Tags: child care services, child protection, economic transition | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
The Winding Road to the Market Transition and the Situation of Children in Bulgaria
The Winding Road to the Market Transition and the Situation of Children in Bulgaria

AUTHOR(S)
Theodora Ivanova Noncheva

Cite this publication | No. of pages: 40 | Thematic area: Countries in Transition | Tags: child welfare, economic transition | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
Market Reforms and Social Welfare in the Czech Republic: A true success story?
Market Reforms and Social Welfare in the Czech Republic: A true success story?

AUTHOR(S)
Miroslav Hirsl; Jiri Rusnok; Martin Fassmann

Cite this publication | No. of pages: 44 | Thematic area: Countries in Transition | Tags: economic policy, economic transition, social welfare | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
Demographic Impact of Sudden Impoverishment: Eastern Europe during the 1989-94 transition
Demographic Impact of Sudden Impoverishment: Eastern Europe during the 1989-94 transition

AUTHOR(S)
Giovanni Andrea Cornia; Renato Paniccià

An alarming drop in population numbers has been observed in many of the transitional countries of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Bloc since the collapse of communism in the region. This paper documents the extent and causes of the crisis. The author finds wanting the currently fashionable explanation - that the observed trends are merely apparent; a phantom risen from the wreckage of the communist propaganda machine. But neither can traditional demographic modelling techniques adequately interpret the dramatic changes being felt in the region. The message is clear. These issues are due a revised approach, for only through a better understanding of the problem can the right solutions be found.
Cite this publication | No. of pages: 48 | Thematic area: Countries in Transition | Tags: demography, economic transition, mortality rate, poverty | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
49 - 60 of 79
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Return on Knowledge: How international development agencies are collaborating to deliver impact through knowledge, learning, research and evidence
Publication

Return on Knowledge: How international development agencies are collaborating to deliver impact through knowledge, learning, research and evidence

Effective collaboration around knowledge management and organizational learning is a key contributor to improving the impact of international development work for the world’s most vulnerable people. But how can it be proven? With only 10 years from the target date for the Sustainable Development Goals, nine of the world’s most influential agencies set out to show to the connection between the use of evidence, knowledge and learning and a better quality of human life. This book – a synthesis of stories, examples and insights that demonstrate where and how these practices have made a positive impact on development programming – is the result of the Multi-Donor Learning Partnership (MDLP), a collective effort to record the ways each of these organizations have leveraged intentional, systematic and resourced approaches to knowledge management and organizational learning in their work.
Gender Solutions: Capturing the impact of UNICEF’s gender equality evidence investments (2014–2021)
Publication

Gender Solutions: Capturing the impact of UNICEF’s gender equality evidence investments (2014–2021)

UNICEF has undertaken hundreds of gender evidence generation activities, supporting programmatic action, advocacy work and policymaking. The Gender Solutions project aims to draw together the knowledge, innovations and impacts of gender evidence work conducted by UNICEF offices since the first UNICEF Gender Action Plan was launched in 2014. A desk review identified over 700 gender-related UNICEF research, evaluation and data evidence generation activities since 2014. Twenty-five outputs were shortlisted because of their high quality and (potential for) impact and three were selected as Gender Evidence Award winners by an external review panel. By capturing the impact of this broad body of work, Gender Solutions aims to showcase UNICEF’s evidence investments, reward excellence and inform the rollout of the UNICEF Gender Policy 2021–2030 and Action Plan 2022–2025.
Annual Report 2021
Publication

Annual Report 2021

The UNICEF Innocenti Annual Report 2021 highlights the key results achieved in research and evidence to inform policymaking and programming.
Responsible Innovation in Technology for Children: Digital technology, play and child well-being
Publication

Responsible Innovation in Technology for Children: Digital technology, play and child well-being

Digital experiences can have significant negative impact on children, exposing them to risks or failing to nurture them adequately. Nevertheless, digital experiences also potentially yield enormous benefits for children, enabling them to learn, to create, to develop friendships, and to build worlds. While global efforts to deepen our understanding of the prevalence and impact of digital risks of harm are burgeoning – a development that is both welcome and necessary – less attention has been paid to understanding and optimizing the benefits that digital technology can provide in supporting children’s rights and their well-being. Benefits here refer not only to the absence of harm, but also to creating additional positive value. How should we recognize the opportunities and benefits of digital technology for children’s well-being? What is the relationship between the design of digital experiences – in particular, play-centred design – and the well-being of children? What guidance and measures can we use to strengthen the design of digital environments to promote positive outcomes for children? And how can we make sure that children’s insights and needs form the foundation of our work in this space? These questions matter for all those who design and promote digital experiences, to keep children safe and happy, and enable positive development and learning. These questions are particularly relevant as the world shifts its attention to emerging digital technologies and experiences, from artificial intelligence (AI) to the metaverse, and seeks to understand their impact on people and society. To begin to tackle these questions, UNICEF and the LEGO Group initiated the Responsible Innovation in Technology for Children (RITEC) project in partnership with the Young and Resilient Research Centre at Western Sydney University; the CREATE Lab at New York University; the Graduate Center, City University of New York; the University of Sheffield; the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the Digital Child; and the Joan Ganz Cooney Center. The research is funded by the LEGO Foundation. The partnership is an international, multi-stakeholder and cross-sectoral collaboration between organizations that believe the design and development of digital technology should support the rights and well-being of children as a primary objective – and that children should have a prominent voice in making this a reality. This project’s primary objective is to develop, with children from around the world, a framework that maps how the design of children’s digital experiences affects their well-being, and to provide guidance as to how informed design choices can promote positive well-being outcomes.

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