What Works for Working Children?

AUTHOR(S)
Jo Boyden; Birgitta Ling

Published: 1998 Innocenti Publications
The current upsurge of international concern about exploitative child labour has focused new attention on fundamental questions regarding children's work in general. What is the effect of work on children? When is it positive and when negative? What kinds of work help children develop valuable skills and attitudes and which violate their rights? This book approaches such questions from a rigorously child-centered perspective which constantly asks, "What is in the best interests of the children involved?" From this point of view it examines recent information and thinking about children's work in relation to child health and development, education, child protection laws, the market economy, children's role in society, and other issues of key importance for policy makers, programme planners and children's advocates. It reviews and summarizes recent research and experience regarding not only child work, but also the processes of child development as they relate to work. Many widespread beliefs and assumptions about both work and childhood are shown to be invalid or highly questionable. Alternative concepts and approaches that better reflect empirical evidence are suggested. This book offers a new way of thinking about children's work from a child development perspective. It is based on new ideas from the social sciences and new research findings. It presents an issue-oriented overview from recent literature and experience on how to approach critical concerns in children's work. This books attempts to look at responses to child labour problems that help working children. In doing so, it examines such complex problems as: How can policy makers and programme managers know what kinds of intervention to undertake? How can children be protected against abuse and exploitation in the workplace? What measures will indeed advance the well-being and development of the children involved? How can ineffective and counterproductive measures be avoided?
Cite this publication | No. of pages: 420 | Thematic area: Child Work and Labour | Tags: child labour, child workers, education, right to education | Publisher: Rädda Barnen and UNICEF ICDC, Florence
School-related Economic Incentives in Latin America:  Reducing drop-out and repetition and combating child labour

School-related Economic Incentives in Latin America: Reducing drop-out and repetition and combating child labour

AUTHOR(S)
Ernesto Schiefelbein

This paper examines the barriers to educational achievement presented by child labour and the formal education systems of Latin America. Parents put pressure on children to work rather than study, and historically the formal education systems have had no safeguards to remedy the resulting knowledge gaps. Knowledge gaps lead to repeated failure in academic courses, which in turn prompts parents to view education as irrelevant. The paper examines the various economic-incentive programmes that have tried to break this vicious circle and identifies four strategies for educational improvement in the region: involving communities, increasing time available for learning, providing bilingual education to serve minorities and indigenous groups, and introducing computers.
Cite this publication | No. of pages: 28 | Thematic area: Education | Tags: child labour, child workers, education, educational systems, right to education | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
Early Childhood Development Revisited: From policy formulation to programme implementation

Early Childhood Development Revisited: From policy formulation to programme implementation

AUTHOR(S)
Cassie Landers; Pascale Fuertes; Cyril Dalais

Published: 1996 Innocenti Global Seminar
This is the report on an inter-agency workshop convened by the Education Cluster of UNICEF New York as a follow-up to the 1989 Innocenti Global Seminar, which investigated and reviewed the most recent scientific knowledge and conceptual approaches to early childhood development. The workshop’s twofold aim was to clarify the process between policy formulation and programming and to foster new alliances, or strengthen existing ones, with other organizations committed to improving children’s chances for healthy development. Specifically, the meeting undertook a detailed analysis of three accepted strategies: parent education, community partnerships and linkages with programmes for vulnerable children.
Exploring Alternative Approaches to Combating Child Labour: Case studies from developing countries

Exploring Alternative Approaches to Combating Child Labour: Case studies from developing countries

AUTHOR(S)
Jo Boyden; William Myers

Cite this publication | No. of pages: 56 | Thematic area: Child Work and Labour | Tags: case studies, child labour, child workers, developing countries, education, right to education | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
The Relationship between Education and Child Work

The Relationship between Education and Child Work

AUTHOR(S)
Jo Boyden

Millions of children throughout the developing world work. Not all child work should be cause for concern. Some work activities develop practical knowledge and skills and reinforce children's sense of self-esteem and unity with their families. It is children's work that is exploitative and dangerous ('child labour') that poses a major human rights and socio-economic challenge. Universal primary education may be the single most effective instrument for meeting this challenge, but because of research inadequacies and the multiplicity of factors involved, a neat causal relationship cannot be established. Drawing on case studies from different countries and exploring the many different ways child work and education are interconnected, this paper seeks to pinpoint concerns that need to be addressed in order to eliminate child labour.
Cite this publication | No. of pages: 44 | Thematic area: Child Work and Labour | Tags: child workers, education, right to education | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
Education Rights and Minorities

Education Rights and Minorities

Published: 1994 Innocenti Publications
Educational rights for minority groups may be included in states' education systems and also enshrined intheir statutes. However, states' laws, their declarations and their educational systems are largely normative statements. For many minority groups, the key issue is whether educational practice actually recognises those legal obligations and aspirations and provides a full, effective and fulfiling education for their young people.
El Trabajo Infantile y la Educación Básica en America Latina y el Caribe

El Trabajo Infantile y la Educación Básica en America Latina y el Caribe

AUTHOR(S)
James R. Himes; Vicky Colbert de Arboleda; Emilio Garcia Mendez

Published: 1994 Innocenti Essay
Education and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child: The challenge of implementation

Education and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child: The challenge of implementation

AUTHOR(S)
Frank Dall

Education and the Market: Which parts of the neo-liberal solution are correct?

Education and the Market: Which parts of the neo-liberal solution are correct?

AUTHOR(S)
Christopher Colclough

Cite this publication | No. of pages: 46 | Thematic area: Economic Development | Tags: economic development, education, liberalism, market economy | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
Education, Skills and Industrial Development in the Structural Transformation of Africa

Education, Skills and Industrial Development in the Structural Transformation of Africa

AUTHOR(S)
Sanjaya Lall

Cite this publication | No. of pages: 40 | Thematic area: Economic Development | Tags: adjustment policies, education, skills development | Publisher: UNICEF ICDC, Florence
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