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105 items found
The aim of this paper is to assess the inter-temporal change in child well-being over the last decade. For this purpose, it compares the child well-being index calculated in the Innocenti Report Cards 7 and 11. Although the two Report Cards use the same methodological framework, they differ in the set of indicators used. It is therefore necessary to compute a modified child well-being index based on the common indicators used in the two Report Cards for the countries under study.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Bruno Martorano; Luisa Natali; Chris De Neubourg; Jonathan Bradshaw
LANGUAGES:
This paper is based on background research undertaken for the UNICEF Innocenti Report Card 11 on child well-being in rich countries. It develops a new domain index of subjective well-being based on several indicators drawn from the Health Behaviour of School Aged Children (HBSC) survey 2009/10, which includes life satisfaction, relationships with family and friends, well-being at school, and subjective health.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Bruno Martorano; Luisa Natali; Chris De Neubourg; Jonathan Bradshaw
LANGUAGES:
This paper aims to provide a comprehensive review of the existing literature on the political economy of CPLs with the specific intention of mapping the relevant channels of impact on the rights and well-being of children living in rural areas where CPLs are fast-proliferating.

AUTHOR(S)

Bethelhem Ketsela Moulat

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Ian Brand-Weiner; Ereblina Elezaj; Lucia Luzi
LANGUAGES:
The paper focuses on child deprivation in Europe and studies the degree to which it is experienced by children in 29 countries using a child specific deprivation scale. The paper discusses the construction of a child deprivation scale and estimates a European Child Deprivation Index for the 29 countries using 14 specific child related variables made available by the child module of the EU-SILC 2009 survey. (REVISED VERSION)

 

Chris De Neubourg; Yekaterina Chzhen; Gill Main; Bruno Martorano; Leonardo Menchini

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Jonathan Bradshaw
LANGUAGES:
This paper presents and discusses child relative income poverty statistics for 35 economically advanced countries, representing all the members of the European Union, Australia, Canada, Iceland, Japan, New Zealand, Switzerland and the United States. According to the data (mostly from 2008), Nordic countries and the Netherlands present the lowest child relative poverty levels, while Japan, the United States, most of the Southern European countries and some of the new EU member states have among the highest.

 

Jonathan Bradshaw; Yekaterina Chzhen; Gill Main; Bruno Martorano; Leonardo Menchini; Chris De Neubourg
LANGUAGES:
This study discusses the theoretical challenge posed in identifying the mechanisms that link institutions and equitable economic growth at various levels of aggregation. The relationship between governance modes and institutions on the one hand, and economic growth and development on the other hand, may take very different forms. This relates to the question of whether a single and unique combination of institutions and governance modes is optimal for (equitable) growth, or whether different governance modes and institutions may lead to good or equitable growth performance in different locations and historical contexts.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Richard Bluhm; Adam Szirmai
LANGUAGES:
Burkina Faso’s hard earned economic gains in recent years have been eroded by the 2008-09 world financial and economic crisis. The country will particularly feel the effects of this crisis due to its close links with the world economy. Most of the adverse effects are transmitted to households and then passed onto children. The situation of children principally depends on the monetary and non-monetary wellbeing of their household. This, together with their greater vulnerability, means that children are at risk of suffering more, and for longer, from the impacts of the crisis. It is therefore crucial to understand and anticipate the effects that the crisis may have on children in Burkina Faso and to propose options for social protection to counter these effects.

 

Lacina Balma; John Cockburn; Ismaël Fofana; Samuel Kaboré; Luca Tiberti
LANGUAGES:
UNICEF has long recognized that there is great value in children’s sport and play, and has been a consistent proponent of these activities in its international development and child protection work. Health, educational achievement and social benefits are just some of the many desirable outcomes associated with organized physical activity. During recent years, however, it has become evident that sport is not always a safe space for children and that the same types of violence and abuse sometimes found in families and communities can also occur in sport and play programmes. The research presented in this publication shows a lack of data collection and knowledge about violence to children in sport, a need to develop the structures and systems for eliminating and preventing this form of violence, and that ethical guidelines and codes of conduct must be established and promoted as part of the prevention system.

AUTHOR(S)

Celia Brackenridge; Kari Fasting; Sandra Kirby; Trisha Leahy
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This paper presents a short overview of the obligations of states under international law to prosecute persons accused of genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity, torture and enforced disappearances, specifically focusing on crimes against children. It also reviews international norms regarding children who may be accused of having participated in the commission of such crimes themselves - for example, as child soldiers - and identifies some outstanding questions regarding their criminal responsibility for such acts.

AUTHOR(S)

Christine Bakker
LANGUAGES:
To support true healing of war-affected populations, including children formerly associated with armed forces and armed groups, transitional justice efforts must attend to the often lasting psychosocial consequences of war in the post-conflict environment. We use key informant and focus group interviews (2002, 2004) to examine the war and post-war experiences of youth, with particular attention to the reintegration experiences of former child soldiers.

AUTHOR(S)

T.S. Betancourt; A. Ettien
LANGUAGES:
105 items found