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118 items found
Despite the acknowledged importance and large scale of rural-urban migration in many developing countries, few studies have compared education outcomes of migrants to those for people born in the city. This paper uses recent data from Dhaka, Bangladesh, and Ho Chi Minh City and Hanoi, Vietnam, to examine educational expenditure and children’s grade attainment, with a focus on poor households.

AUTHOR(S)

Stuart Cameron
LANGUAGES:

This technical note refers to a special application of MODA, and applies a multidimensional deprivation analysis to a cross-country setting (CC-MODA). The CC-MODA study gives insights to child deprivation within and across countries, and provides an indication on who the multiply-deprived children are, where they live and what aspects of child well-being they are deprived of. This paper offers an in depth explanation of the technical decisions that have been made to obtain these results.

 

Chris De Neubourg; Jingqing Chai; Marlous de Milliano; Ilze Plavgo
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These guidelines present a detailed step-by-step procedure of how to carry out a multiple overlapping deprivation analysis. They aim at providing technical guidance by capturing lessons acquired from previous research, indicating the range of decisions to be made and the various risks each of the different choices may lead to.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Chris De Neubourg; Jingqing Chai; Marlous de Milliano; Ilze Plavgo
LANGUAGES:

Children living in urban slums in Dhaka, Bangladesh, often have poor access to school and attend different types of school than students from middle class households. This paper asks whether their experiences in school also disadvantage them further in terms of their learning outcomes and the likelihood of dropping out.

AUTHOR(S)

Stuart Cameron
LANGUAGES:

The paper focuses on child deprivation in Europe and studies the degree to which it is experienced by children in 29 countries using a child specific deprivation scale. The paper discusses the construction of a child deprivation scale and estimates a European Child Deprivation Index for the 29 countries using 14 specific child related variables made available by the child module of the EU-SILC 2009 survey. (REVISED VERSION)

 

Chris De Neubourg; Yekaterina Chzhen; Gill Main; Bruno Martorano; Leonardo Menchini

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Jonathan Bradshaw
LANGUAGES:

This paper presents and discusses child relative income poverty statistics for 35 economically advanced countries, representing all the members of the European Union, Australia, Canada, Iceland, Japan, New Zealand, Switzerland and the United States. According to the data (mostly from 2008), Nordic countries and the Netherlands present the lowest child relative poverty levels, while Japan, the United States, most of the Southern European countries and some of the new EU member states have among the highest.

 

Jonathan Bradshaw; Yekaterina Chzhen; Gill Main; Bruno Martorano; Leonardo Menchini; Chris De Neubourg
LANGUAGES:

This paper tries to respond to the complex challenge of going beyond a research approach into child well-being based on averages and proposes a complementary approach to compare inequalities across economically advanced countries. More specifically, the objective of this paper is to explore and compare the extent of disparity at the bottom-end of the distribution of child well-being, focusing on the gap between the child in the middle of the distribution and those who are disadvantaged, i.e. those at the bottom of the distribution.

AUTHOR(S)

Candace Currie; Dorothy Currie; Leonardo Menchini; Chris Roberts; Dominic Richardson
LANGUAGES:

This study presents an econometric model to estimate changes in the under-five mortality rate in a number of countries in sub-Saharan Africa over the years 1995-2007. The discussion centres on models with different specifications, and on the results obtained after testing several of them. The paper argues that initial models adopted to forecast the potential impact of the food and financial crisis overestimated the increase in mortality. However, the more complex tool presented in this study proves that under-five mortality rates have indeed increased (or declined less than predicted) due to the food and financial crises. The estimates provide signposts for remedies to protect children and their families when new shocks arrive.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Giovanni Andrea Cornia; Stefano Rosignoli; Luca Tiberti
LANGUAGES:

Burkina Faso’s hard earned economic gains in recent years have been eroded by the 2008-09 world financial and economic crisis. The country will particularly feel the effects of this crisis due to its close links with the world economy. Most of the adverse effects are transmitted to households and then passed onto children. The situation of children principally depends on the monetary and non-monetary wellbeing of their household. This, together with their greater vulnerability, means that children are at risk of suffering more, and for longer, from the impacts of the crisis. It is therefore crucial to understand and anticipate the effects that the crisis may have on children in Burkina Faso and to propose options for social protection to counter these effects.

 

Lacina Balma; John Cockburn; Ismaël Fofana; Samuel Kaboré; Luca Tiberti
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This paper is among the first to analyse children's experiences of reparations programmes, taking into consideration programmes from Africa, Asia and Latin America. The violence, abuse and hardship that girls and boys suffer during armed conflict and political violence under authoritarian and dictatorial regimes continues to severely affect their development long after the end of war or demise of the violent regime.

AUTHOR(S)

Dyan Mazurana; Khristopher Carlson
LANGUAGES:

118 items found