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34 items found
Greece is among the countries hit most severely by the recent global economic crisis. Given that poverty in childhood and adolescence can have lifelong implications, investigation of the impact of the crisis on various aspects of adolescents’ well-being is critical for guiding prevention policies.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Anna Kokkevi; Myrto Stavrou; Eleftheria Kanavou; Anastasios Fotiou
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This report explores the ways in which information and communication technologies (ICTs) can contribute to efforts towards meeting child-focused development goals. It serves as a key contribution on which to build informed dialogue and decision making, developed jointly between research, policy and practice.

COORDINATOR(S)

Patrizia Faustini

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Dorothea Kleine; Sammia Poveda; David Hollow
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This paper aims to provide a comprehensive review of the existing literature on the political economy of CPLs with the specific intention of mapping the relevant channels of impact on the rights and well-being of children living in rural areas where CPLs are fast-proliferating.

AUTHOR(S)

Bethelhem Ketsela Moulat

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Ian Brand-Weiner; Ereblina Elezaj; Lucia Luzi
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Burkina Faso’s hard earned economic gains in recent years have been eroded by the 2008-09 world financial and economic crisis. The country will particularly feel the effects of this crisis due to its close links with the world economy. Most of the adverse effects are transmitted to households and then passed onto children. The situation of children principally depends on the monetary and non-monetary wellbeing of their household. This, together with their greater vulnerability, means that children are at risk of suffering more, and for longer, from the impacts of the crisis. It is therefore crucial to understand and anticipate the effects that the crisis may have on children in Burkina Faso and to propose options for social protection to counter these effects.

 

Lacina Balma; John Cockburn; Ismaël Fofana; Samuel Kaboré; Luca Tiberti
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UNICEF has long recognized that there is great value in children’s sport and play, and has been a consistent proponent of these activities in its international development and child protection work. Health, educational achievement and social benefits are just some of the many desirable outcomes associated with organized physical activity. During recent years, however, it has become evident that sport is not always a safe space for children and that the same types of violence and abuse sometimes found in families and communities can also occur in sport and play programmes. The research presented in this publication shows a lack of data collection and knowledge about violence to children in sport, a need to develop the structures and systems for eliminating and preventing this form of violence, and that ethical guidelines and codes of conduct must be established and promoted as part of the prevention system.

AUTHOR(S)

Celia Brackenridge; Kari Fasting; Sandra Kirby; Trisha Leahy
LANGUAGES:

Le Burkina Faso à vu ses gains économiques, durement acquis ces dernières années, rongés par la crise financière et économique mondiale du 2008-09. Il subit particulièrement les conséquences de la crise économie mondiale vu le lien étroit qu'il entretient avec l’économie globale. La plupart des effets néfastes sont d’abord transmis aux ménages, puis répercutés aux enfants. Ainsi, la situation des enfants dépend principalement du bien-être monétaire et non monétaire de leurs ménages. Par conséquent et étant donné leur plus grande vulnérabilité, les enfants risquent de souffrir davantage et plus longtemps des impacts de la crise.

AUTHOR(S)

Luca Tiberti; Ismaël Fofana; John Cockburn; Lacina Balma; Samuel Kaboré
LANGUAGES:

There is need for a holistic, comprehensive ECD monitoring system that covers the multiple facets (i.e. education, health, social protection and the social and economical context in which the child is born) of public and private ECD interventions in a country. Such a system is essential for ensuring that all children can reap the benefits of ECD. It serves as a means of support and oversight for monitoring the performance and planning of ECD policies and programmes in developing countries. The paper highlights the importance of comprehensive ECD monitoring for making evidence-based decisions, and discusses practical issues to take into consideration when developing such a system.

AUTHOR(S)

Marco Kools; Virginia E. Vitiello
LANGUAGES:

This paper presents a secondary analysis of supporting documents from the UN Study on Violence against Children. The purpose of the analysis is to identify sport-related material in the documents and gaps in research knowledge about the role of sport in both preventing and facilitating violence against children. This is a complementary document to the IRC study ‘Protecting Children from Violence in Sport: A review with a focus on industrialized countries’ (forthcoming in 2010), developed by the same research team.

 

Celia Brackenridge

AUTHOR(S)

Kari Fasting; Sandra Kirby; Trisha Leahy; Sylvie Parent; Trond Svela Sand
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Special Series on the Situation of Children in Immigrant Families in Affluent Societies

In 2005, 4.9 million immigrants were residing in metropolitan France. This was 8.1 per cent of the population. Children of immigrants represent close to one fifth of all children. Children with at least one parent from Algeria, Morocco, or Tunisia make up almost 40 per cent of these children, and children of sub-Saharan African origin make up one eighth. Of the 3.5 million foreigners living in France in 2004, 450,000 were children aged 0-17 whose parents were foreign born.

AUTHOR(S)

Thomas Kirszbaum; Yael Brinbaum; Patrick Simon

CONTRIBUTOR(S)

Esin Gezer
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Special Series on the Situation of Children in Immigrant Families in Affluent Societies

There were about 1.5 million children 0 to 17 years of age in immigrant families in Australia in 2001. This represented almost 33 per cent of all children. More than a quarter of these children were in families from the most consistent countries of immigrant origin, Ireland and the United Kingdom. Another 17 per cent were in families from other parts of Europe, while 10 per cent were in families from New Zealand, and 3 per cent were in families from other countries in Oceania.

AUTHOR(S)

Gerry Redmond; Ilan Katz
LANGUAGES:

34 items found