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95 items found
Hungary and Iceland were among the countries most affected by the recent macroeconomic shock. Although they suffered a similar GDP drop and started from much the same fiscal conditions, their respective governments decided to follow different strategies of adjustment. Each country cut public spending according to different priorities.

AUTHOR(S)

Bruno Martorano
LANGUAGES:

The risk and time preferences of individuals as well as their subjective expectations regarding the future are likely to play an important role in choice behaviour. A large-scale survey in Kenya shows that cash transfers alone do not appear to impact time discounting or risk aversion, but they do have an important impact on subjective well-being measures and on future perceptions of quality of life.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Bruno Martorano; Sudhanshu Handa; Carolyn Halpern; Harsha Thirumurthy
LANGUAGES:

Tackling inequities in children’s outcomes matters both from a moral perspective, and because of persuasive social and economic arguments. Reducing inequity in children’s outcomes requires tackling structural and social issues.

 

Michael Marmot; Ruth Bell; Angela Donkin
LANGUAGES:

As in other developed countries, the recent economic crisis affected the Australian economy. Nonetheless, while the OECD countries recorded a drop of GDP near to 4 per cent in 2009, in Australia GDP grew by 1.4 per cent. An important contribution to this performance came from the fiscal stimulus implemented by the government.

AUTHOR(S)

Bruno Martorano
LANGUAGES:

The focus in this paper is on non-contributory social transfers which are considered to be the main social protection instruments targeted specifically at poor and vulnerable households, and which are financed from general government revenues.

 

Franziska Gassmann; Cecile Cherrier; Andrés Mideros Mora; Pierre Mohnen
LANGUAGES:

This paper compares the well-being of children across the most economically advanced countries of the world. It discusses the methodological issues involved in comparing children’s well-being across countries and explains how a Child Well-being Index is constructed to rank countries according to their performance in advancing child well-being. This paper is one of the three background papers written as the basis for Report Card 11 (2013), ‘Child Well-being in Rich Countries: A Comparative Overview’.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Bruno Martorano; Luisa Natali; Chris De Neubourg; Jonathan Bradshaw
LANGUAGES:

The aim of this paper is to assess the inter-temporal change in child well-being over the last decade. For this purpose, it compares the child well-being index calculated in the Innocenti Report Cards 7 and 11. Although the two Report Cards use the same methodological framework, they differ in the set of indicators used. It is therefore necessary to compute a modified child well-being index based on the common indicators used in the two Report Cards for the countries under study.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Bruno Martorano; Luisa Natali; Chris De Neubourg; Jonathan Bradshaw
LANGUAGES:

This paper is based on background research undertaken for the UNICEF Innocenti Report Card 11 on child well-being in rich countries. It develops a new domain index of subjective well-being based on several indicators drawn from the Health Behaviour of School Aged Children (HBSC) survey 2009/10, which includes life satisfaction, relationships with family and friends, well-being at school, and subjective health.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Bruno Martorano; Luisa Natali; Chris De Neubourg; Jonathan Bradshaw
LANGUAGES:

Consumption expenditure is probably the most common and preferred welfare indicator; however, its measurement is a challenging and time-consuming task. Although short consumption modules have potentially enormous advantage in terms of time and money savings, a recent and comprehensive literature on available experiments comparing short versus long modules is still lacking.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Luisa Natali; Marta Moratti
LANGUAGES:

Based on an extensive analysis of the existing evidence on the impact of social protection programmes in the developing world, this paper aims to assess what are the channels that have to be taken into account to understand how the benefits of social protection could be maximized with specific regard to the different dimensions of children’s well-being (economics and livelihood, education, health, nutrition).

AUTHOR(S)

Marco Sanfilippo; Bruno Martorano; Chris De Neubourg
LANGUAGES:

95 items found