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103 items found
A combination of economic growth and committed revenue-raising should give most governments in Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union considerable scope to devote increased resources to tackling poverty. We review the extent and nature of poverty across the transition countries, emphasising the phenomenon of the working-age poor. We consider governments' fiscal positions and revenue raising tools, including the issue of whether some countries now have levels of external debt servicing that are so high as to hamper social sector expenditures.

AUTHOR(S)

Jeni Klugman; John Micklewright; Gerry Redmond
LANGUAGES:

The concept of social exclusion has been widely debated in Europe but its application to children has seen relatively little discussion. What the social exclusion of children can lead to is the first main theme of the paper, where among other things, the choice of reference group, the geographical dimension of exclusion, and the issue of who is responsible for any exclusion of children are considered. The second main theme is the use of the concept of exclusion in the USA, where in contrast to Europe it has achieved little penetration to date.

AUTHOR(S)

John Micklewright
LANGUAGES:

This unique study goes beyond the standard analysis of child poverty based on poverty rates at one point in time and documents how much movement into and out of poverty by children there actually is, covering a range of industrialised countries - the USA, UK, Germany, Ireland, Spain, Hungary and Russia. £st23.95

AUTHOR(S)

John Micklewright; Bruce Bradbury; Stephen P. Jenkins
LANGUAGES:

This book analyses the living standards of the nearly 80 million children in the European Union, who represent over a fifth of its total population. By analysing the trends of child well-being in Europe over the last two decades, this book asks: Is the well-being of children in the EU becoming more similar across member states? Or are countries diverging while their economies converge?

AUTHOR(S)

John Micklewright; Kitty Stewart
LANGUAGES:

Single Parents and Child Welfare in the New Russia provides new evidence and analysis of the effects of this phenomenon of child welfare and assesses the social policy responses of the Russian government. The authors emphasize the urgent need for detailed country-level analysis of the situation at a time of great change and increased risk.

AUTHOR(S)

Jeni Klugman; Albert Motivans
LANGUAGES:

Within the last decade governments of donors and developing countries have committed themselves to achieving a number of International Development Targets (IDTs) to be reached by 2015. But the task is daunting for most of the low-income countries.

AUTHOR(S)

Santosh Mehrotra
LANGUAGES:

Progress towards the target of universal access to basic education by the year 2000, set by two global conferences in 1990, has been too slow in many countries. Most of the reasons for this inadequate progress are country-specific. However, in virtually all countries one explanation stands out: inadequate public finance for primary education.

AUTHOR(S)

Enrique Delamonica; Santosh Mehrotra; Jan Vandemoortele
LANGUAGES:

This paper examines the successes of ten 'high-achievers' - countries with social indicators far higher than might be expected given their national wealth. Their progress in such fields as education and health offers lessons for social policy elsewhere in the developing world.

AUTHOR(S)

Santosh Mehrotra
LANGUAGES:

This paper compares child poverty dynamics cross-nationally using panel data from seven nations: the USA, Britain, Germany, Ireland, Spain, Hungary, and Russia. As well as using standard relative poverty definitions the paper examines flows into and out of the poorest fifth of the children's income distribution.

AUTHOR(S)

Bruce Bradbury; Stephen P. Jenkins; John Micklewright
LANGUAGES:

There is a general consensus that basic social services are the building blocks for human development. Indeed,they are now accepted as fundamental human rights. But there is a widening gap between the consensus and the reality of public spending on basic services such as education and health.

AUTHOR(S)

Santosh Mehrotra; Jan Vandemoortele; Enrique Delamonica
LANGUAGES:

103 items found