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33 items found
This paper reports the impact on child schooling and work of the Government of Zambia’s Child Grant Programme (CGP), an unconditional cash transfer programme targeted to households with children aged under 3 years in three districts of the country. The impacts reported here lead to the conclusion that unconditional cash transfers in Africa have significant positive impacts on children’s human capital.

AUTHOR(S)

Sudhanshu Handa; Luisa Natali; David Seidenfeld; Gelson Tembo; Zambia Cash Transfer Evaluation Team
LANGUAGES:
The aim of the paper is to understand how short consumption modules fare relative to a longer and more detailed consumption module in terms of the accuracy of the resulting estimates. The objective is particularly challenging as the use of non-equivalent samples makes it difficult to assess the accuracy and reliability of the estimates obtained.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Luisa Natali; Chris De Neubourg
LANGUAGES:
This paper describes the evolution of child poverty in 41 OECD and/or European Union countries during the Great Recession. In 2012 there were around 76.5 million children living in poverty in the 41 OECD countries studied here. A League Table of the 50 US states, home to over a third of all children in the OECD shows that child poverty has increased in 34 out of 51 states.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Sudhanshu Handa; Luisa Natali; Yekaterina Chzhen; Bruno Martorano
LANGUAGES:
This paper explores the late impact of the Great Recession by using Gallup World Poll data. This data may be exploited to obtain an indication of what the trends have been up to 2013 for a number of well-being-related indicators in different dimensions. An additional advantage with the World Poll is the more complete country coverage which goes beyond that provided by EU-only databases.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Goran Holmqvist; Luisa Natali
LANGUAGES:
The goal of this paper is to monitor the impact of the Great Recession on child well-being in countries of the European Union. Data from the EU-28 plus Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Turkey is used to document the change in children’s well-being from 2007/8-2012/3. The authors classify countries into ‘least’, ’moderately’ and ‘most’ exposed to the global recession and document trends in well-being outcomes for each of the three groups.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Luisa Natali; Bruno Martorano; Sudhanshu Handa; Goran Holmqvist; Yekaterina Chzhen
LANGUAGES:
This paper compares the well-being of children across the most economically advanced countries of the world. It discusses the methodological issues involved in comparing children’s well-being across countries and explains how a Child Well-being Index is constructed to rank countries according to their performance in advancing child well-being. This paper is one of the three background papers written as the basis for Report Card 11 (2013), ‘Child Well-being in Rich Countries: A Comparative Overview’.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Bruno Martorano; Luisa Natali; Chris De Neubourg; Jonathan Bradshaw
LANGUAGES:
This paper links the concept and practice of accountability with child rights, by asking: (1) What accountability means when children are the rights holders, and whose role is it to exact that accountability? (2) What are the assumptions underpinning social accountability, and how can they be revised from the child-rights perspective? (3) How do social and political dynamics at community and national levels, often not linked to child rights issues, shape accountability outcomes?

AUTHOR(S)

Lena Thu Phuong Nguyen
LANGUAGES:
The aim of this paper is to assess the inter-temporal change in child well-being over the last decade. For this purpose, it compares the child well-being index calculated in the Innocenti Report Cards 7 and 11. Although the two Report Cards use the same methodological framework, they differ in the set of indicators used. It is therefore necessary to compute a modified child well-being index based on the common indicators used in the two Report Cards for the countries under study.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Bruno Martorano; Luisa Natali; Chris De Neubourg; Jonathan Bradshaw
LANGUAGES:
This paper is based on background research undertaken for the UNICEF Innocenti Report Card 11 on child well-being in rich countries. It develops a new domain index of subjective well-being based on several indicators drawn from the Health Behaviour of School Aged Children (HBSC) survey 2009/10, which includes life satisfaction, relationships with family and friends, well-being at school, and subjective health.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Bruno Martorano; Luisa Natali; Chris De Neubourg; Jonathan Bradshaw
LANGUAGES:
Consumption expenditure is probably the most common and preferred welfare indicator; however, its measurement is a challenging and time-consuming task. Although short consumption modules have potentially enormous advantage in terms of time and money savings, a recent and comprehensive literature on available experiments comparing short versus long modules is still lacking.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Luisa Natali; Marta Moratti
LANGUAGES:
33 items found