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Innocenti Working Papers

The Working Papers are the foundation of the Centre's research output, underpinning many of the Centre's other publications. These high quality research papers are aimed at an academic and well-informed audience, contributing to ongoing discussion on a wide range of child-related issues. More than 100 Working Papers have been published to date, with recent and forthcoming papers covering the full range of the Centre's agenda. The Working Papers series incorporates the earlier series of Innocenti Occasional Papers (with sub-series), also available for download.

LATEST

The Effect of Cash Transfers and Household Vulnerability on Food Insecurity in Zimbabwe

We study the impact of the Zimbabwe Harmonized Social Cash Transfer (HSCT) on household food security after 12 months of implementation. The programme has had a strong impact on a well-known food security scale – the Household Food Insecurity Access Scale (HFIAS) – but muted impacts on food consumption expenditure. However aggregate food consumption hides dynamic activity taking place within the household where the cash is used to obtain more food from the market and rely less on food received as gifts.

INNOCENTI WORKING PAPERS BY DATE

171 items found
Evidence based on independent studies from different programmes across the world demonstrates that cash transfers can have an impact on a wide range of development domains. But does this evidence mean that cash transfers are the silver bullet or best solution to alleviating poverty?

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Sudhanshu Handa; David Seidenfeld; Benjamin Davis; Gelson Tembo; Zambia Cash Transfer Evaluation Team
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This paper investigates differences in the perceived impact of the economic crisis between adults in households with and without children in 17 European countries. It also explores the channels through which the crisis affected adults in households with children and the ways in which they coped with the decline in income or economic activity.

AUTHOR(S)

Yekaterina Chzhen
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This paper investigates the effect of the economic crisis on child poverty and material deprivation across the EU-28 plus Iceland, Norway and Switzerland. The findings suggest that social safety nets and social spending did not shield children from the effects of labour market turbulence during the Great Recession.

AUTHOR(S)

Yekaterina Chzhen
LANGUAGES:
During the late 2000s, European countries were affected by an economic crisis considered the most severe since the Second World War. However, not all the countries were hit in the same way. Some governments preferred to increase taxes while others preferred to reduce public expenditure, also cutting benefits and services for children and their families.

AUTHOR(S)

Bruno Martorano
LANGUAGES:
Hungary and Iceland were among the countries most affected by the recent macroeconomic shock. Although they suffered a similar GDP drop and started from much the same fiscal conditions, their respective governments decided to follow different strategies of adjustment. Each country cut public spending according to different priorities.

AUTHOR(S)

Bruno Martorano
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This paper reviews the insights of various contributions from research into multidimensional poverty and deprivation and combines them into an internally consistent framework. The proposed framework aims at creating more conceptual clarity and overcoming the challenges that have arisen from some earlier efforts.The paper also makes a distinction between household poverty and child poverty, recognising that children may experience poverty differently to adults.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Chris De Neubourg; Marlous de Milliano; Ilze Plavgo
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The risk and time preferences of individuals as well as their subjective expectations regarding the future are likely to play an important role in choice behaviour. A large-scale survey in Kenya shows that cash transfers alone do not appear to impact time discounting or risk aversion, but they do have an important impact on subjective well-being measures and on future perceptions of quality of life.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Bruno Martorano; Sudhanshu Handa; Carolyn Halpern; Harsha Thirumurthy
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The Multiple Overlapping Deprivation Analysis for the European Union (EU-MODA) compares the material well-being of children across the EU member states, using data from the child material deprivation module of the European Union Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) 2009.

AUTHOR(S)

Yekaterina Chzhen; Chris De Neubourg
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This research sets out to understand the why, how and with whom of rural-urban internal migration of children to Ressano Garcia, a border town between Mozambique and South Africa. It addresses the overarching research question of how to strengthen child protection systems for unaccompanied migrant children. By identifying children’s reasons for migrating, it identifies the main risks they encounter once they start living and working in Ressano Garcia. These include: lack of access to educational opportunities, exposure to child labour exploitation, trafficking and smuggling.

AUTHOR(S)

Andrea Verdasco
LANGUAGES:
This initial exploratory study examines the governance and finance of Early Childhood Services (ECS) in three countries (Cambodia, Kenya and Lao People's Democratic Republic) using an in-depth qualitative approach. The methodologies and tools provide an innovative strategy built upon the literature of governance and finance to understand how to improve access, quality and equity of ECS.

Pia Rebello Britto; Hirokazu Yoshikawa

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Jan Van Ravens; Liliana A. Ponguta; Soojin S. Oh; Roland Dimaya; Richard C. Seder
LANGUAGES:
171 items found