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The Working Papers are the foundation of the Centre's research output, underpinning many of the Centre's other publications. These high quality research papers are aimed at an academic and well-informed audience, contributing to ongoing discussion on a wide range of child-related issues. More than 100 Working Papers have been published to date, with recent and forthcoming papers covering the full range of the Centre's agenda. The Working Papers series incorporates the earlier series of Innocenti Occasional Papers (with sub-series), also available for download.

LATEST

Children and the Data Cycle:Rights and Ethics in a Big Data World

In an era of increasing dependence on data science and big data, the voices of one set of major stakeholders – the world’s children and those who advocate on their behalf – have been largely absent. A recent paper estimates one in three global internet users is a child, yet there has been little rigorous debate or understanding of how to adapt traditional, offline ethical standards for research involving data collection from children, to a big data, online environment (Livingstone et al., 2015). This paper argues that due to the potential for severe, long-lasting and differential impacts on children, child rights need to be firmly integrated onto the agendas of global debates about ethics and data science. The authors outline their rationale for a greater focus on child rights and ethics in data science and suggest steps to move forward, focusing on the various actors within the data chain including data generators, collectors, analysts and end-users. It concludes by calling for a much stronger appreciation of the links between child rights, ethics and data science disciplines and for enhanced discourse between stakeholders in the data chain, and those responsible for upholding the rights of children, globally.
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INNOCENTI WORKING PAPERS BY DATE

187 items found
This paper links the concept and practice of accountability with child rights, by asking: (1) What accountability means when children are the rights holders, and whose role is it to exact that accountability? (2) What are the assumptions underpinning social accountability, and how can they be revised from the child-rights perspective? (3) How do social and political dynamics at community and national levels, often not linked to child rights issues, shape accountability outcomes?

AUTHOR(S)

Lena Thu Phuong Nguyen
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The aim of this paper is to assess the inter-temporal change in child well-being over the last decade. For this purpose, it compares the child well-being index calculated in the Innocenti Report Cards 7 and 11. Although the two Report Cards use the same methodological framework, they differ in the set of indicators used. It is therefore necessary to compute a modified child well-being index based on the common indicators used in the two Report Cards for the countries under study.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Bruno Martorano; Luisa Natali; Chris De Neubourg; Jonathan Bradshaw
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This paper is based on background research undertaken for the UNICEF Innocenti Report Card 11 on child well-being in rich countries. It develops a new domain index of subjective well-being based on several indicators drawn from the Health Behaviour of School Aged Children (HBSC) survey 2009/10, which includes life satisfaction, relationships with family and friends, well-being at school, and subjective health.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Bruno Martorano; Luisa Natali; Chris De Neubourg; Jonathan Bradshaw
LANGUAGES:
Despite the acknowledged importance and large scale of rural-urban migration in many developing countries, few studies have compared education outcomes of migrants to those for people born in the city. This paper uses recent data from Dhaka, Bangladesh, and Ho Chi Minh City and Hanoi, Vietnam, to examine educational expenditure and children’s grade attainment, with a focus on poor households.

AUTHOR(S)

Stuart Cameron
LANGUAGES:
This technical note refers to a special application of MODA, and applies a multidimensional deprivation analysis to a cross-country setting (CC-MODA). The CC-MODA study gives insights to child deprivation within and across countries, and provides an indication on who the multiply-deprived children are, where they live and what aspects of child well-being they are deprived of. This paper offers an in depth explanation of the technical decisions that have been made to obtain these results.

 

Chris De Neubourg; Jingqing Chai; Marlous de Milliano; Ilze Plavgo
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These guidelines present a detailed step-by-step procedure of how to carry out a multiple overlapping deprivation analysis. They aim at providing technical guidance by capturing lessons acquired from previous research, indicating the range of decisions to be made and the various risks each of the different choices may lead to.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Chris De Neubourg; Jingqing Chai; Marlous de Milliano; Ilze Plavgo
LANGUAGES:
Children living in urban slums in Dhaka, Bangladesh, often have poor access to school and attend different types of school than students from middle class households. This paper asks whether their experiences in school also disadvantage them further in terms of their learning outcomes and the likelihood of dropping out.

AUTHOR(S)

Stuart Cameron
LANGUAGES:
Consumption expenditure is probably the most common and preferred welfare indicator; however, its measurement is a challenging and time-consuming task. Although short consumption modules have potentially enormous advantage in terms of time and money savings, a recent and comprehensive literature on available experiments comparing short versus long modules is still lacking.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Luisa Natali; Marta Moratti
LANGUAGES:
This paper offers a theoretical understanding of childhood poverty and educational exclusion, building on the empirical findings of fieldwork carried out in Bangladesh to develop case studies addressing the questions, why do so many socio-economically disadvantaged children tend to drop out from formal secondary school, and why do some succeed?

AUTHOR(S)

M. Mahruf C. Shohel
LANGUAGES:
This paper aims to provide a comprehensive review of the existing literature on the political economy of CPLs with the specific intention of mapping the relevant channels of impact on the rights and well-being of children living in rural areas where CPLs are fast-proliferating.

AUTHOR(S)

Bethelhem Ketsela Moulat

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Ian Brand-Weiner; Ereblina Elezaj; Lucia Luzi
LANGUAGES:
187 items found