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Research Watch

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Social Protection in Emergency Situations
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Social Protection in Emergency Situations

Social protection has increasingly been considered as an effective policy-level intervention for reducing vulnerability and extreme poverty, and for contributing to the development and structural transformation of a society. In their capacity of providing responsive long-term systems, Social Protection programmes can help to reduce poverty, inequality and deprivation, as well as stimulate human development, social peace and resilience.The increased complex and protracted crises that have forced nearly 60 million people, half of them children, to leave their homes due to conflict and violence; the human and economic cost of disasters highlighted the need for considering long-term policy responses able to reach vulnerable populations in a more consistent way. An International Conference on Social Protection in Contexts of Fragility and Forced Displacement took place in Brussels in September 2017 with the aim to shed new light on the prospects of using social protection systems in these contexts; to highlight the opportunity for humanitarian responses either to build on existing social protection systems or to help create them, with a view to work towards a humanitarian-development continuum.Innocenti communication team interviewed six experts attending the Conference to talk about existing challenges, experience and potential social protection programmes in contexts of fragility, forced displacement, and prolonged crisis, as well as to identify future directions for research. Watch the videos and listen to Tilman Bruck, Sheree Bennett, Andrew Kardan, Paolo Verme, Ugo Gentilini and Fabio Veras Soares.
Children on the move
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Children on the move

An estimated 50 million children are on the move in the world today. Millions more have been deeply affected by migration. The need for solid evidence to develop better policies on child migration has never been greater. This edition of Research Watch brings together leading thinkers for insightful discussion on the research agenda for children on the move.
Are we failing adolescent girls?
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Are we failing adolescent girls?

The latest Research Watch analyzes the assumptions which underpin the many ways our societies fail to protect adolescent girls.
Youth, Conflict and Peace Building
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Youth, Conflict and Peace Building

Martin Bell, UNICEF UK Ambassador and former BBC war correspondent, presents the latest UNICEF Debate.
Development, digital innovation and children
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Development, digital innovation and children

In our studios experts analyse the past and the future of digital innovation and children
Violence against children: a silent threat
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Violence against children: a silent threat

A billion children experience abuse in their lives? The Debate looks at solutions and bottlenecks to end violence against children.
Nutrition: Problems, Potential & Progress - The Debate
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Nutrition: Problems, Potential & Progress - The Debate

Millions of children still malnourished? In our studio we bring together more than a century of expertise, and ask: 'why, & what are the solutions'.
Climate change and children
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Climate change and children

From droughts to flash floods, failing crops and increased disease, the earth’s climate is changing.This Debate looks at the science, the politics, the impact, and the next generation asking what actions on climate change will most benefit children and young people and how we can bring youth into the climate change debate. In our studio: the Head of Climate Change at ODI, Dr Tom Mitchell; Professor Saleem Ul Huq, the Senior Fellow in the Climate Change Group at the International Institute for Environment and Development; and Ms Esther Agbarakwe, head of the Nigerian youth climate coalition.
An AIDS-free generation? - The Debate
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An AIDS-free generation? - The Debate

An AIDS-free generation? Answering that question in our studio are: Joy Phumaphi, former Minister of Health, Botswana, Geeta Rao Gupta, Deputy Executive Director, UN Children’s Fund, Attapon Ed Ngoksin, International Treatment Preparedness Coalition, and John Santelli, Professor, Columbia University.
Post 2015: What next? - The Debate
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Post 2015: What next? - The Debate

The Millennium Development Goals are set to expire in 2015. What next? A lively debate with Amina Az-Zubair, former Special Assistant to the Nigerian President on MDGs; Naila Kabeer, Prof of Development Studies at SOAS; and Claire Melamed, Head of Growth, Poverty and Inequality Programme at ODI.
Averting Famine, Acting Early - The debate
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Averting Famine, Acting Early - The debate

Are famine and nutrition crises preventable? How? Who is accountable? A debate with Fatima Jibrell, Founder and Director of Horn of Africa Relief, Stephen Devereux, Development Economist, Institute of Development Studies and As Sy, UNICEF Eastern and Southern Africa Regional Director.
Why is equity in health care crucial for the well being of children?
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Why is equity in health care crucial for the well being of children?

The issues are tackled by Dr Cesar Victora, President of the IEA, Dr Janet Vega, Director of Centre for Epidemiology and Public Health Policy, Chile, and Dr Mickey Chopra, UNICEF's Chief of Health.
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