KEEP UP TO DATE

CONNECT  facebook youtube pinterest twitter soundcloud
search advanced search

Monitoring in the CEE/CIS and Baltics: the MONEE project

facebook twitter linkedin google+ reddit print email
Since 1990 UNICEF has gradually extended its advocacy, information, emergency and - in a few cases - programme assistance activities to the countries of Central and Eastern Europe and to members of the former Soviet Union. This initial report and those that will be produced at regulare intervals by the 'Monitoring the Transition in Central and Eastern Europe' (MONEE) project are part of these technical assistance and advocacy activities. The project is carried out in close collaboration with the central statistical offices and a number of policy centres of the region and aims to document and analyse the social impact of reforms initiated since 1989 in a systematic, continuous and comparative way.
Since 1990 UNICEF has gradually extended its advocacy, information, emergency and - in a few cases - programme assistance activities to the countries of Central and Eastern Europe and to members of the former Soviet Union. This initial report and those that will be produced at regulare intervals by the 'Monitoring the Transition in Central and Eastern Europe' (MONEE) project are part of these technical assistance and advocacy activities. The project is carried out in close collaboration with the central statistical offices and a number of policy centres of the region and aims to document and analyse the social impact of reforms initiated since 1989 in a systematic, continuous and comparative way.

LATEST PUBLICATIONS

This paper looks at how the transition from the planned to the free market economy has altered the nature of state protective child care provision in Central and Eastern Europe. The old systems were run according to an underlying state ideology that stressed an insensitive ‘medical model’ of care.

AUTHOR(S)

Mary Anne Burke
This paper has three parts. The first examines the problems of Romanian children at risk in their natural families; the second analyses the conditions of abandoned children, children in institutions and other children in special circumstances of risk; the third offers a summary of the policy environment.

AUTHOR(S)

Catalin Zamfir; Elena Zamfir
This paper offers an analysis of the hardships and the threats to children during the transition in Poland. Because all the various poverty lines used to distinguish the poor from the non-poor point to the same conclusion that under-15-year-olds represent the population group most at risk of poverty.

AUTHOR(S)

Stanislawa Golinowska; Bozena Balcerzak-Paradowska; Bozena Kolaczek; Dorata Glogosz
After the collapse of the communist system in 1989, most Eastern European countries experienced a mortality and health crisis. However, this did not hit the traditionally most vulnerable groups - children, adolescents, women and the elderly - but male adults in the 20-59 age group.

From January 1992 to the first half of 1994 the death rate in Russia rose by over 30 per cent, a rise of a magnitude never before seen in an industrialized country without a war or famine. In 1993 alone the life expectancy of a Russian man fell from 62 to 59. This paper examines the nature and causes of this unprecedented and disastrous increase.

AUTHOR(S)

Kitty Stewart; Jacob Nell
An alarming drop in population numbers has been observed in many of the transitional countries of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Bloc since the collapse of communism in the region. This paper documents the extent and causes of the crisis.

AUTHOR(S)

Giovanni Andrea Cornia; Renato Paniccià
The collapse of communism in East Germany took place alongside unification with its democratic neighbour, West Germany. This made the East German experience of the ‘transition’ - from the planned to the free-market economy - unique among that of the post-socialist states.

AUTHOR(S)

Magdalena Joos
This paper looks at how state family support policies have fared in nine of the countries that have undergone the transition to the free-market economy. It asks whether such positives as did exist prior to 1989 have survived to benefit the children of today.

AUTHOR(S)

Gaspar Fajth
Despite improved economic performance in Central and Eastern Europe in 1994 and 1995, there was still no clear and comprehensive evidence that the welfare crisis was ending. This third Regional Monitoring Report confirms the social trends observed since 1989, showing in particular that children have suffered disproportionately in the fields of child care, education, adolescent protection and poverty.

This working paper documents the economic and social crises in Georgia during the 1990s, their structural causes and the survival strategies adopted by the Georgian population - the vast majority of whom became impoverished, with large families particularly vulnerable.

AUTHOR(S)

Teimuraz Gogishvili; Joseph Gogodze; Amiran Tsakadze
MORE PUBLICATIONS