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Implementation of the Convention on the Rights of the Child

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This paper investigates the dilemmas that arise in applying the ‘best interests’ principle - particularly as the term is used in Article 3(1) of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child - to concrete situations involving the treatment of children.

AUTHOR(S)

Philip Alston; Bridget Gilmour-Walsh
This title focuses on the implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child as it relates to children's basic economic and social rights in developing countries in terms of the obligations placed by the Convention on both States and the international community.

AUTHOR(S)

James R. Himes
This title focuses on the implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child as it relates to children's basic economic and social rights in developing countries in terms of the obligations placed by the Convention on both States and the international community.

AUTHOR(S)

James R. Himes

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Diana Saltarelli
From 1992 to 1995, the Children's Rights Development Unit worked to promote the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child in the UK. The process, which involved many individuals (children included) and hundreds of organizations, is documented here.

AUTHOR(S)

Gerison Lansdown
This paper first examines the use of human, economic and organizational resources in producing social outputs, in terms of the two main forms that resources take: 'stocks' and 'flows'. Based on this framework, several key measures are identified for increasing the availability of resources for the implementation of child rights, including changes in technologies and processes, and the expanded use of 'non-traditional' resources for children.

AUTHOR(S)

David Parker
Traditional methods of assessment of the success of a nation in meeting the obligations of the CRC have centred upon an analysis of comparative ‘social indicator’ statistics. This paper showcases an attempt at a more ad hoc approach in its analysis of the development of health care systems in Chile and Thailand. This ‘historical’ method - with its emphasis upon the unique experience of the individual country - reveals that despite adverse economic circumstances both countries have shown an impressive level of commitment to child rights.

AUTHOR(S)

Claudio Sepùlveda
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