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Since 2000, UNICEF IRC has released 9 issues in the Innocenti Report Card series addressing different aspects of the living conditions of children and adolescents in economically advanced countries. All the Report Cards are built around a 'league table' which ranks countries according to their performance on key child indicator(s). From 2011 onwards the Report Card series will have 4 recurrent themes, which aim at providing a set of child poverty and deprivation monitoring instruments focused on rich (OECD) economies.

The cycle will include a multiple overlapping deprivation analysis, a multidimensional analysis of child well-being and analysis of children left behind with measurements of inequality. The series offers original and authoritative material in an interesting format to policy makers, academics, child rights defenders and the media and also provides support to National Committees.

The upcoming issue, Report Card 10, focuses on the direct experience of individual children under a multi-dimensional perspective and the extent to which deprivations occur simultaneously in multiple dimensions. The comparison of results of the child multidimensional poverty analysis and the child income poverty results will provide a better understanding on the concrete meaning of monetary poverty in the 30 countries included in the study (and eventually on the adequacy of their respective poverty lines).

Since 2000, UNICEF IRC has released 9 issues in the Innocenti Report Card series addressing different aspects of the living conditions of children and adolescents in economically advanced countries. All the Report Cards are built around a 'league table' which ranks countries according to their performance on key child indicator(s). From 2011 onwards the Report Card series will have 4 recurrent themes, which aim at providing a set of child poverty and deprivation monitoring instruments focused on rich (OECD) economies.

The cycle will include a multiple overlapping deprivation analysis, a multidimensional analysis of child well-being and analysis of children left behind with measurements of inequality. The series offers original and authoritative material in an interesting format to policy makers, academics, child rights defenders and the media and also provides support to National Committees.

The upcoming issue, Report Card 10, focuses on the direct experience of individual children under a multi-dimensional perspective and the extent to which deprivations occur simultaneously in multiple dimensions. The comparison of results of the child multidimensional poverty analysis and the child income poverty results will provide a better understanding on the concrete meaning of monetary poverty in the 30 countries included in the study (and eventually on the adequacy of their respective poverty lines).

LATEST PUBLICATIONS

A great change is coming over childhood in the world's richest countries. Today's rising generation is the first in which a majority are spending a large part of early childhood in some form of out-of-home child care. At the same time, neuroscientific research is demonstrating that loving, stable, secure, and stimulating relationships with caregivers in the earliest months and years of life are critical for every aspect of a child’s development. Taken together, these two developments confront public and policymakers in OECD countries with urgent questions. Whether the child care transition will represent an advance or a setback for today's children and tomorrow's world will depend on the response.

AUTHOR(S)

Peter Adamson
Questo rapporto presenta un'estesa analisi della condizione e del benessere dei bambini e dei giovani in 21 paesi del mondo industrializzato. Si pone l'obiettivo di favorire il monitoraggio, di consentire la comparazione e di stimolare il dibattito e lo sviluppo di politiche volte a migliorare la vita dei bambini. Lo studio si pone l'obiettivo di misurare e comparare il benessere dei bambini e dei giovani esaminandolo alla luce di sei parametri diversi: il benessere materiale, la salute e la sicurezza, l'istruzione, i rapporti con la famiglia ed i coetanei, i comportamenti e rischi, e la auto-percezione che essi hanno del proprio benessere.

In this paper the situation of three EU countries that have recently experienced substantial but very different reforms of their systems to support families with children is analysed and compared: Austria, Spain and the United Kingdom. The structure of these systems is very different: Austria gives emphasis to universal benefits, Spain to tax concessions and the United Kingdom to means-tested benefits. Basically, the recent reforms have reinforced these structures in each country while increasing the amount of public resources directed towards children. However, are the chosen strategies the most adequate for each country? What would have happened to the economic well-being of children if instead of reinforcing the existing types of policies these countries had completely transformed the architecture of their systems in another direction? More concretely, what would be the effect on child poverty and on income distribution?

AUTHOR(S)

Holly Sutherland; Christine Lietz; Horacio Levy
The proportion of children living in poverty has risen in a majority of the world's developed economies. No matter which of the commonly-used poverty measures is applied, the situation of children is seen to have deteriorated over the last decade. This publication is the sixth in a series of Innocenti Report Cards designed to monitor and compare the performance of the OECD countries in meeting the needs of their children.

This paper documents levels and changes in child poverty rates in 12 OECD countries using data from the Luxembourg Income Study project, and focusing upon an analysis of the reasons for changes over the 1990s. The objective is to uncover the relative role of income transfers from the state in determining the magnitude and direction of change in child poverty rates, holding other demographic and labour market factors constant. As such the paper offers a cross-country overview of child poverty, changes in child poverty and the impact of public policy in North America and Europe.

AUTHOR(S)

Miles Corak; Wen-Hao Chen
The objective of this paper is to analyse the impact of fiscal policy on the economic resources available to children, and on the child poverty rate. A static microsimulation model specifically designed for the purposes of comparative fiscal analysis in the European Union, EUROMOD, is used to study the age incidence of government taxes and transfers in 2001 in 15 EU countries.

AUTHOR(S)

Miles Corak; Christine Lietz; Holly Sutherland
This paper offers a descriptive portrait of income poverty among children in Germany between the early 1980s and 2001, with a focus on developments since unification in 1991. Data from the German Socio-Economic Panel are used to estimate poverty rates, rates of entry to and exit from poverty, and the duration of time spent in and out of poverty. The analysis focuses upon comparisons between East and West Germany, by family structure, and citizenship status.

AUTHOR(S)

Miles Corak; Michael Fertig; Marcus Tamm
This paper has three objectives. The first is to discuss the major issues involved in defining and measuring child poverty. The choices that must be made are clarified and a set of six principles to serve as a guide for public policy is proposed. The second objective is to take stock of child poverty and changes in child poverty in the majority of OECD countries since about 1990 when the Convention on the Rights of the Child came into force. Finally, the third objective is to formulate a number of suggestions for setting credible targets for the elimination of child poverty in the rich countries. This involves the development of appropriate and timely information sources as well as the clarification of feasible targets that may vary across the OECD.

AUTHOR(S)

Miles Corak
The paper considers child poverty in rich English-speaking countries - U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, the U.K. and Ireland. It is sometimes assumed that these countries stand out from other OECD countries for their levels of child poverty. The paper looks at the policies they have adopted to address the problem.

AUTHOR(S)

John Micklewright
A combination of economic growth and committed revenue-raising should give most governments in Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union considerable scope to devote increased resources to tackling poverty. We review the extent and nature of poverty across the transition countries, emphasising the phenomenon of the working-age poor. We consider governments' fiscal positions and revenue raising tools, including the issue of whether some countries now have levels of external debt servicing that are so high as to hamper social sector expenditures.

AUTHOR(S)

Jeni Klugman; John Micklewright; Gerry Redmond
Do preferences for income inequality differ systematically between the post-socialist countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the Western established market economies? This paper analyses 1999 data from a large international survey to address this question. In particular, we examine whether attitudes to inequality differ between East and West even after the 'conventional' determinants of attitudes are controlled for. Results suggest that this is indeed the case.

AUTHOR(S)

Marc Suhrcke
This paper compares child poverty dynamics cross-nationally using panel data from seven nations: the USA, Britain, Germany, Ireland, Spain, Hungary, and Russia. As well as using standard relative poverty definitions the paper examines flows into and out of the poorest fifth of the children's income distribution.

AUTHOR(S)

Bruce Bradbury; Stephen P. Jenkins; John Micklewright
This paper describes the specific initiatives of the British Labour government to reduce child poverty and evaluates their potential impact. The extent of the problem of child poverty is set out, the causes are discussed and Britain’s problem is set in an international perspective. Policies that address long-term disadvantage are also discussed and future strategy is considered.

AUTHOR(S)

Holly Sutherland; David Piachaud
The persistence of child poverty in rich countries undermines both equality of opportunity and commonality of values. It therefore confronts the industrialized world with a test both of its ideals and of its capacity to resolve many of its most intractable social problems. This new research asks what can be learned about the causes of child poverty and examines the policies that have contributed to the success of lower rates in some countries.

The accession of up to 13 new members in the next decade is the most important development now facing the European Union. This paper analyses measurable differences in the well-being of children between current club members, the EU Member States, and the 10 Central and Eastern European applicants seeking admission.

AUTHOR(S)

Kitty Stewart; John Micklewright
MORE PUBLICATIONS

Project team

Chris de Neubourg ; Leonardo Menchini


Partner organizations

HBSC International Coordinating Centre - Child and Adolescent Health Research Unit

Organization for Economic Development and Cooperation


Related Innocenti Projects

2016-2017

Children in high income countries


2014-2015

Report Card 12


2013

Report Card 11


2006-2009

Understanding child poverty and wellbeing

PROJECTS ARCHIVE